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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2000): Social Housing - UK

GREEN PAPER: A SUMMARY OF THE CIH RESPONSE

Chartered Institute of Housing

Housing, Sept. 2000, supplement, 4p.

Summarises the Chartered Institute of Housing's response to the government's consultation paper on social housing. Response covers proposals on sustainable home ownership, the private rented sector, local authority housing stock transfer, choice in lettings, affordable rents, and Housing Benefit.

HOUSING AND HEALTH: A JOINT APPROACH: THE MANCHESTER EXPERIENCE

H. Bartle

Housing, Care and Support, vol.3, Sept. 2000, p. 23-26

The Manchester Healthy City project has carried out a major consultation with communities over the action plan for the Healthy City Initiative. The four key themes that emerged concerned housing and homelessness, the environment, crime and disorder and mental health. These have formed the basis for key areas of work in which housing takes a lead role. Article identifies some of the joint initiatives which are going on in the various areas of strategic planning, commissioning and service delivery.

THE HOUSING GREEN PAPER: MESSAGES FOR HOUSING WITH CARE AND SUPPORT

G. Taylor

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 3, Sept. 2000, p. 4-6

Article summarises the key proposals in the governments housing green paper and considers how the vision of housing outlined in it needs to complement and support other policy developments in the health and social care sectors, including the new policy and funding framework for supported housing. It identifies some problem areas associated with rent restructuring and the reform of lettings policies which might affect people in need of housing with support.

HOUSING UNITED: THE FINAL REPORT OF THE IPPR FORUM ON THE FUTURE OF SOCIAL HOUSING

IPPR Forum on the Future of Social Housing

London: Institute for Public Policy Research, 2000

The report presents the findings of an independent inquiry into the future of social housing. It sets out a long-term vision for social housing, together with detailed proposals for who it should be for, how it should be financed and how it should be owned and run. The report also describes the contribution that housing can and should make to the success of local economies and communities, and sets out proposals to make a reality of the Governments housing policy of 'a decent home for all'.

THE IMPACT OF NEW FINANCE OPTIONS ON TENANTS

M. Kingsford

Axis, vol. 55, Aug./Sept. 2000, p. 24-25

Tenant participation compacts, best value in housing and resource accounting all involve tenants in strategic direction of local authority housing management.

'JOINED-UP' THINKING: A CO-HOUSING COMMUNITY PILOT PROJECT

M. Brenton

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 3, Sept. 2000, p. 20-22

Presents Co-Housing Communities, pioneered in the Netherlands, as models for providing supported accommodation for older people. These schemes involve groups of older people forming co-operatives to run their housing complexes and organise shared activities and mutual support.

LET TENANTS CHOOSE

P. O'Kane

Roof, Sept./Oct. 2000, p. 17

Presents a critique of two proposals floated by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions for setting fair and affordable rents for social housing: the "running costs" option and the "property values and affordability mix" option. Argues that landlords need flexibility to take tenants views into account in local rent structures.

NO QUICK FIX FOR HMOs

C. King

Roof, Sept./Oct. 2000, p. 14

Article looks at the potential pitfalls of the scheme for mandatory licensing of houses in multiple occupation introduced in Scotland in October 2000.

ONE SECTOR, ONE REGULATOR

M. Reid

Roof, Sept./Oct. 2000, p. 16

Under proposals in the forthcoming Scottish Housing Bill, Scottish Homes will become responsible for introducing and implementing a new single framework for regulation for all social landlords, including local authorities' landlord and homelessness functions.

PARTNERS IN CRIME?

E. Hawkey

Housing, Sept. 2000, p. 39-41

Partnering schemes to procure maintenance contracts for social housing will save landlords millions of pounds on the cost of repairs. However these agreements contravene section 20 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, which requires landlords to consult with leasehold residents about repairs.

PRESSING THE POINT HOME

A. Griffiths

Municipal Journal, Aug. 25th 2000, p. 20

Reports that the Chartered Institute for Environmental Health has produced a model scheme for licensing houses in multiple occupation (HMOs). It is hoped that this model will help to speed up the government's progress towards its goal of licensing all HMOs.

RSLs AND REGENERATION

D. Seviour

Axis, vol. 55, Aug./Sept. 2000, p. 18-21

Describes innovative tenant-led reforms at Leicester Housing Association.

SCOTLAND'S VIRTUAL HOMES

G. Corbett

Roof, Sept./Oct. 2000, p. 30-32

Summarises proposals for reform to be embodied in the forthcoming Scottish Housing Bill, including: the single social tenancy; the enhanced regulatory role of Scottish Homes; provision for the homeless; and the future of the right to buy.

SCOTTISH EXECUTIVE LAUNCHES HEATING SCHEME

M. Nicholson

Financial Times, Sept. 19th 2000, p. 9

Reports launch of a scheme to install free central heating for all Scottish pensioners and social housing tenants within five years. The scheme will be funded by the Scottish Executive with contributions, both financial and in kind, from gas and power companies.

(See also Independent, Sept. 19th 2000, p. 4)

SPENDING TWIXT GREEN PAPER AND BILL

C. Griffin

Axis, vol. 55, Aug./Sept. 2000, p. 6-8

An interview with Nick Raynsford in which various in which various questions of local authority housing finance, tenant choice, and the impact of the planning system on regeneration and the supply of affordable housing are discussed.

A SWANSONG FOR EGAN?

J. Adams

Axis, vol. 55, Aug./Sept. 2000, p. 26-27

Argues that implementation of the Egan report recommendations on partnering between social landlords and private contractors requires training in negotiating skills, clarification of the residents' role, and arbitration facilities.

WHY HOME IS THE KEY

J. Birch

Roof, Sept./Oct. 2000, p. 34-36

Reports on various initiatives being introduced to help key workers such as nurses find affordable accommodation. Argues that the best solution would be to increase nurses' wages so that they could afford decent accommodation.

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