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Welfare Reform on the Web - January 2001: Care of the elderly - UK

THE AGE-OLD CARE DILEMMA

C. Russell

Community Care, no.1341, 2000, p.14

Argues that provision of quality long-term care for older people is incompatible with low taxation.

COST OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE AND LEVEL OF RESEARCH FUNDING

Ana Lowin, Paul McCrone and Martin Knapp

Cambridge: Alzheimer's Research Trust, 2000

Report estimates the true cost of caring for approximately half a million people who have Alzheimer's Disease in the UK is between 7bn and 14bn per year. Also shows that research on Alzheimer's is underfunded compared to the amounts spent on cancer, stroke and heart disease research.

DIRECT PAYMENTS MAY OPEN THE DOOR FOR WIDER CHOICES

M. Witton

Caring Times, Oct. 2000, p.18

The extension of the Direct Payments Act to older people may enable some to leave residential care and return to independent living in the community.

DOMICILIARY CARE

B. McClimont

Registered Homes and Services, vol.5, 2000, p.86-89

Gives an overview of the development of independent domicilary care services, their role in intermediate care, and the scope for partnership working with primary care trusts.

THE FUTURE IS LOOKING INTERMEDIATE

F. Rickford

Community Care, no.1341, 2000, p.20-22

The government is investing 800m in intermediate care to promote independence for older people by reducing admissions to hospital, facilitating discharge from hospital and promoting rehabilitation. The success of the intermediate care programme depends on the availability of sufficient therapists, such as psychotherapists, dieticians, and physiotherapists. Without input from suitability qualified specialists, the programme could deny older people access to appropriate health care.

HOME ALONE

A. Thompson

Community Care, no.1344, 2000, p.22-23

Isolation in old age is caused by poor health, fear of crime and low incomes. It can be tackled by the creation of local support networks and the encouragement of active ageing.

INTERMEDIATE CARE

J. Stevenson

Registered Homes and Services, vol.5, 2000, p.89-91

Gives an overview of the role envisaged for intermediate care services in the NHS Plan. Funding will be available for integrated services aimed at promoting independence and avoiding unnecessary admission to acute and long-term care.

JOINT INVESTMENT PLANS: A POSITIVE MOVE FORWARD

N. Jones

Managing Community Care, vol.8, Oct. 2000, p.3-5

Reports results of an evaluation of the first round of joint investment plans for older people's services. Concerns arising include failure to engage Primary Care Groups and hospital consultants, and lack of success in embedding assessment and care co-ordination systems that deal meaningfully with individual need. Also reports on the development of joint investment plans for assisting disabled people to return to work.

A NEW SYSTEM FOR CARE FUNDING?

CareAware

2000

Presents an independent review of the government's response to the proposals of the Royal Commission on Long Term Care. Concludes that the provision of free nursing care offered by the government will be of limited value to the majority of individuals who will still have to use their savings to pay for personal care and "hotel" costs.

THE NHS PLAN AND OLDER PEOPLE

Anon

Registered Homes and Services, vol.5, 2000, p.66-68

A representative group of experts give their views of the implications of the NHS plan for the care of older people. There is particular concern about the implications of the distinction drawn between nursing care (which will be free) and personal care (which will be means-tested).

 

REGISTRATION AND THE CARE STANDARDS ACT

P. Grose

Caring Times, Oct. 2000, p.10

Outlines changes in the rules of registration of care homes introduced by the Care Standards Act 2000, which gives significant new powers to the registration authority.

RESOURCES FOR REGULATION

Anon

Registered Homes and Services, vol.5, 2000, p.81-83

The government wishes the National Care Standards Commission to be self-financing through fee income from regulated establishments and agencies. Unless there is some public subsidy, inspection fees charged to care homes are likely to rise. Home owners will find difficulty in passing these increases on in the shape of increased charges to local authorities, who have shown themselves very reluctant to pay more for places.

SCOTS TEST CASE COULD LEAD TO CASH CHAOS FOR COUNCILS

R. McKay

Community Care, no.1344, 2000, p.12

Mr Arthur MacGregor is 90 and in need of residential care. The local council lacks resources to fund this immediately and has placed him on a waiting list. His lawyers have petitioned the Court of Session to rule the council's stance unlawful.

SCOTTISH RETHINK ON CARE OF ELDERLY PUTS McLEISH "PUPPET" TAG IN DOUBT

K. Scott

Guardian, Nov. 6th 2000, p.4

Henry McLeish, Scotland's first minister, is considering making all personal as well as nursing care free to the elderly in residential homes. This raises the prospect of a fresh split between Holyrood and Westminster.