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Welfare Reform on the Web - January 2001: Social Housing - UK

BLUEPRINT FOR PLANNING AFFORDABLE HOUSING

C. Holmes

Axis, Oct/Nov. 2000, p. 12-13

Argues that reforms are needed to planning mechanisms if affordable housing provision is t be maximised and mixed tenure developments are to be achieved.

CHECKING THE BILL

D. Robertson

Roof, Nov/Dec. 2000, p. 25-27

Reports a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the Scottish Housing Bill in the areas of homelessness, the single social tenancy, regulation, tenant participation and strategic direction.

CLOSED DOOR?

Roof, Nov/Dec. 2000, p. 9

Argues that the change in the rent regime for housing associations to reduce annual increases from RPI (Retail Price Index) plus one per cent to RPI only will devastate stock transfer landlords ability to repair and build houses. This abolition of real rent increases could be the kiss of death to large scale voluntary transfers of council housing stock.

COMMON SENSE EVOLUTION

P. Williams

Roof, Nov/Dec. 2000, p. 20

Comments on the newly unveiled Conservative Party housing policy. This involves promotion of home ownership through increased right to buy discounts, extension of the right to buy to housing association properties, encouragement of shared ownership, disposal of empty council housing and relaunch of rent to mortgage.

GETTING BETTER

H. Whelan

Axis, Oct/Nov. 2000, p. 20-21

Looks at the prospects for joint working on housing and health improvement from the perspective of professionals at both ends of the spectrum.

HOUSING POLICY CHANGES ON THE HORIZON

D. Rose

Municipal Journal, Oct. 13th - 18th 2000, p. 15

Predicts passage of a short Housing Bill giving councils new powers to tackle homelessness and to deal with bad landlords in buildings of multiple occupancy. The role of councils as social landlords will be reduced as stock is transferred to housing associations and "arms-length" companies, but they will have new responsibilities to take a strategic view of all housing needs.

KEEPING TRANSFERS AT ARMS LENGTH?

P. Williams

Axis, Oct/Nov. 2000, p. 6-7

Gives an in-depth analysis of potential options available to councils for investing in their housing stock, focusing on the "arms length company" option.

LEFT ON THEIR OWN

S. Wilcox

Roof, Nov/Dec. 2000, p. 32-33

Almost half of the poorest people in Britain are home owners, yet they receive only 8% of government housing support. Mortgage Interest Tax Relief has been abolished and the Housing Green Paper proposes the abolition of means-tested home improvement grants. The number of recipients of Income Support and Job Seekers Allowance claiming help with mortgage costs has also fallen due both to the fall in unemployment and to time delays on eligibility introduced in 1995. Article argues for the introduction of a tenure-neutral housing allowance scheme to end discrimination against low-income homeowners.

NO OPTION

E. Harkins

Housing, Oct. 2000, p. 32-35

The chief executive of the new Glasgow Housing Association explains why there is no alternative to large-scale transfer of the city's council housing.

SEE YOU IN COURT?

J. Gascoigne and A. Hayward

Housing, Oct. 2000, p. 28-31

Explores the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998 for landlords and tenants of social housing. Relevant provisions are: 1) the right to privacy and respect for family life; 2) right to a fair and public hearing; 3) right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions; 4) prohibition of discrimination.

SOMETHING NEW FOR SOMEONE OLDER

B. Randall

Housing, Oct. 2000, p. 38-39

Presents case studies for Co-Housing Schemes for older people in the USA, Sweden and the Netherlands.

VILLAGE VOICE

T. Dwelly

Roof, Nov/Dec. 2000, p. 21-24

Case studies of two Cornish villages show that housing problems in rural areas arise from lack of affordable property to buy or rent combined with low wages.

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