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Welfare Reform on the Web - January 2001: National Health Service - community and primary care services

FOSTERING THE SPIRIT OF INNOVATION IN PCTS

I. Ayres and B. Sany

British Journal of Health Care Management, vol. 6, 2000, p. 469-471

Describes innovative organisational design work conducted to support the creation of the Nelson and West Merton Primary Care Trust. Proposes that PCTs should develop as "agile" organisations which depend on teamwork, continuously adapt, adopt an on going quality improvement approach and engage with technological change. They will develop a partnership culture, "patient-centric" information systems, integrated networks of care, and user participation in decision-making.

HEALTH WITHOUT A CARE

S. Abbott and S. Gilliam

Health Services Journal, vol. 110, Nov. 2nd 2000, p.32

Primary care services in the NHS have been given a remit for "health improvement". Different sets of guidance from the Department of Health define this concept differently. If it is taken to mean health promotion and tackling inequalities that affect health, then PCGs have not been given extra resources to fund initiatives in these areas and can only pursue such objectives through multi-agency working.

NO MEAN FEAT

C. Laurent

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Oct. 19th 2000, p.16

The newly launched National Association of Lay People in Primary Care is lobbying for Primary Care Trusts to have a single Trust Board to take on the functions presently divided between the trust board and the executive committee. Is also wants lay people serving on PCT boards to receive higher pay to encourage ordinary people to apply.

ON THE BOARD

A. Clarke

Community Practitioner, vol. 73, 2000, p. 779-780

Explores the experience of community nurses on primary care group boards. Their influence is growing as their experience and confidence increase, but board membership is time-consuming and many nurses find it difficult to balance their involvement with the PCG and their clinical work.

PENSION PERKS TO LURE BACK GPs

J. Sherman

Times, Oct. 30th 2000, p.6

Government is considering a package of financial perks to bring retired GPs back into the surgery and to persuade others not to retire early. GPs could be allowed to continue working after 60 while also drawing a full pension. GPs under 70 who have retired within the past five years will be encouraged to return with attractive pension rights.

TESTING THE FEASIBILITY OF A 'ONE-STOP-SHOP' FOR THE OLDER PATIENT

J. Duddle, S. Iliffe and P. Lenihan

Community Practitioner, vol. 73, 2000, p. 793-795

Describes how one medium sized inner city practice tested the feasibility of multidisciplinary working with older people through a clinic offering medical care, physiotherapy, podiatry and advice about benefits entitlements.

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