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Welfare Reform on the Web - January 2001: Social care - UK

ARE INDICATORS EFFECTIVE AT WEIGHING-UP SERVICES?

S. Wellard

Community Care, no. 1345, 2000, p.10-11

Expresses concern about social services performance indicators on the grounds that they disturb priorities, undermine local accountability, and fail to take into account the differing social and economic characteristics of local authorities.

CAN'T PAY, WON'T TRAIN

A. Taylor

Community Care, no.1342, 2000, p.14

Proposes a central fund for social work training to provide resources for three year courses and avoid a drop in standards as pressure mounts to beat the skills shortage.

COUNCILS OUTSOURING 51% OF SOCIAL CARE

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Oct. 19th 2000, p.8

A survey by Laing and Buisson shows that English local authorities are purchasing 51% of social care services from voluntary and private sector providers, up from 2% eight years ago. Home care continues to be focused on the most dependent clients, with the less dependent receiving less or no help.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER?

G. Wistow

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Oct. 19th 2000, p.26-27

Little consideration has been given to the proposals for social care in the NHS plan. The emphasis on social services' role in unblocking beds ignores their responsibilities to the whole community. The plan is ambiguous on health improvement, and there is a risk of health promotion being sidelined.

GOING FOR BROKE

R. Winchester

Community Care, no. 1343, 2000, p.20-21

The high cost of accommodation and relatively low pay are contributing to a recruitment crisis for social workers in the South East. Councils are struggling to maintain services with high staff turnover and massive vacancy rates.

THE 'JOINED UP' MANAGEMENT OF ADULT HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE SERVICES IN NORTHERN IRELAND: LESSONS FOR THE REST OF THE UK?

J. Campbell and J. McLaughlin

Managing Community Care, vol. 8, Oct. 2000, p. 6-13

Article describes and critically analyses the development of the "integrated service" in Northern Ireland, with particular reference to community care for adults. Evidence from a number of studies is used to identify strengths and weakness of this service.

LOOK AND LEARN

D. Statham

Community Care, no. 1342, 2000, p.24

Outlines how the Review of the Diploma in Social Work and the Quality Strategy for Social Care will affect the way social work students are trained. There is likely to be a greater emphasis on work-based training, collaboration between educational institutions and employers, and a national curriculum.

MORE THAN JUST A DRAG

T. Shifrin

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Oct. 19th 2000, p.14-15.

Explores briefly the history of relationships and links between health and social services. Explains that a great deal of joint working between health and social care takes place informally, but is under-reported.

PEOPLE NEED PEOPLE

Audit Commission

Audit Commission Publications, 2000

Finds that local authority social services departments fail to manage, train and retain a quality workforce.

PRIMARY CONCERNS

A. Phillips

Community Care, no. 1340, 2000, p. 26-27

One of the key objectives of the Health Act 1999 is to enable health services to take responsibility for some core social services, such as those to older and disabled people. Article explores the cultural differences and similarities between health and social care services. Much work is needed to achieve the mutual understanding that will make joint working possible.

A QUESTION OF TRUST

R. Jones

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Oct. 19th 2000, p.28-29

Care Trusts present an opportunity to drive forward the integration of health and social services. The constitution, powers and accountability of care trusts have yet to be announced by the government. It is important for their success that they are not perceived as takeovers of one organisation by another. The appointment of board members will be a key issue.

SOCIAL CARE SAFETY NET TO BE 'SPRINGBOARD FOR SUCCESS'

S. Ward

Public Finance, Oct. 27th-Nov. 2nd 2000, p.12

Reports 284m extra public spending on Social Services. This includes an extra 158m for Quality Protects, 85m to enable councils to extend loan schemes to help homeowners avoid selling their houses to pay for residential care, and 41m to establish a social work student support scheme.

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