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Welfare Reform on the Web (February 2001): Education - UK - Higher

CHILDREN IN CARE BLIGHTED BY LACK OF AMBITION

G. Owen

Times, Dec. 11th 2000, p.4

Research by the Institute of Education at London University shows that only one in 100 children in care goes on to university compared to one in three of the generality of school-leavers, and that only 3% obtain five or more good GCSE passes compared to 49% of the school population as a whole. Article announces the launch of a scheme to track care leavers who have moved into higher education to discover the obstacles they face and the support they need.

REFORM DEAL NETS UNIVERSITIES £350M

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Nov. 17th 2000, p.5

English universities will be required to introduce performance-related pay schemes for academics in return for £350m in extra state funding for wages over the next three years.

SECOND PROGRESS REPORT FROM THE FUNDING OPTIONS REVIEW GROUP

London: Universities UK, 2000

Report models various funding options for higher education institutions, including: an increase in the current maximum means-tested fee from £1000 to £2000 a year; an increase in the maximum means-tested fee to £3000 for subjects leading to higher future earnings and £2000 for other subjects; the removal of the ceiling on the means-tested fee so that the richest students pay the average total funding, about £4000. Report notes that such upfront fees can deter students and investigates various repayment schemes from graduates' incomes. It looks at schemes where the funding would follow the student through vouchers or the government's individual learning accounts rather than being allocated by the funding councils to the universities.

SOCIOECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE AND ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION

A. Forsyth and A. Furlong

Bristol: Policy Press, 2000

Barriers to young people from low-income families reaching higher education include poor performance at school and financial barriers, such as reluctance to get into debt, fears about the costs of leaving home and commuting, and fear of not finding a job at the end of the course.

UNIVERSITY FUNDING SET TO RISE BY £1BN A YEAR

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Nov. 16th 2000, p.1

Announces that state funding for universities will be £6.4bn in 2003-04, a 10% increase in real terms. Government has also pledged that funding per student will not fall over the next three years, reversing an historic decline that began in the 1980s. The money will help underpin the planned expansion in numbers of people entering higher education.

(See also Independent, Nov. 17th 2000, p.2; Guardian, Nov. 17th 2000, p.16; Times, Nov. 17th 2000, p.8).