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Welfare Reform on the Web - February 2001: National Health Service - Community and Primary Care Services

DOCTORS DISMISS BMA WARNING ON GP APPOINTMENTS

J. Laurance

Independent, Nov 21st 2000, p.10

Reports that the Head of the Primary Care Development Team has argued that access to GPs for patients can be speeded up by changes in working practices such as offering telephone consultations or referral to a nurse. He refutes the British Medical Association's claim that an extra 10,000 doctors would be needed to meet the government's target of guaranteeing every patient an appointment within 48 hours.

FACING UP TO THE CHALLENGING AGENDA OF INTEGRATED CARE

R. Martell

Community Practitioner, vol.73, 2000, p.820

Discusses the role of integrated nursing in primary care. Integrated nursing is a way of formalising group working between nurses operating in different fields.

FROM PCGs TO PCTs: WORK IN PROGRESS: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

L. Marks and D. T. Hunter

Retford: NHS Alliance, 2000

Research shows that almost half of the primary care groups that responded to a survey felt they were being pressured into merging with other PCGs to form large independent trusts.

HOUSE OF UNREPRESENTATIVES

D. James and M. Willitts

Health Service Journal, vol.110, Nov 23rd 2000, p.32-33

Results of a survey of lay members of primary care group boards show that 84% are over 45 years old and 52% are women. Ethnic minorities, young people and those in traditional full-time employment are largely excluded.

INVESTIGATING THE HEALTH NEEDS OF OLDER PEOPLE IN THE COMMUNITY

R. McCabe et al

Community Practitioner, vol.73, 2000, p.832-834

Describes how an inner-city practice engaged older patients in a debate about health in later life and the need to change the ways in which health services work. Public involvement of this kind is a NHS Plan objective which has proved hard to achieve in practice.

LAY PEOPLE IN PRIMARY CARE TRUSTS: TURNING THE RHETORIC INTO REALITY

National Association of Lay People in Primary Care

London: 2000

Proposes that at least two lay people should be appointed to each PCT executive committee if the present bicameral structure is retained. PCTs should also define clearly the roles that lay people will be expected to play on their Trust Boards, and be prepared to pay them appropriate remuneration. They should then advertise the posts in the local media, making it clear that successful applicants will be given support and training as well as appropriate remuneration. The role of the lay Chair of the Trust Board is in particularly urgent need of redefinition. If the role is to be anything other than nominal, a commitment of at least 2 days a week to the job is essential.

MILBURN TELLS GPs TO CHANGE MENTALITY

D. Charter

Times, Nov 21st 2000, p.2

The Health Secretary has argued that GPs can speed up access through innovative working practices such as using nurses to filter patients. He said that up to half of GPs already guaranteed appointments within 48 hours and he saw no reason why the rest could not follow suit.

(See also Daily Telegraph, Nov 21st 2000, p.10).