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Welfare Reform on the Web (February 2001): Social Security - UK - New Deal

DISABLED TOLD TO SEEK WORK OR LOSE BENEFITS

P. Waugh and S. Schaefer

Independent, 27th Nov. 2000, p.4

Reports that a new medical examination, the Personal Capability Assessment, is to be introduced for people claiming Incapacity Benefit. It will focus on identifying which jobs claimants could do. All new claimants will then face a "work focused interview" which will use the test results to identify appropriate local jobs. Anyone who refuses to look for work suggested by the test will face benefit cuts. Anyone who refuses to take part in either the test or the interview will be denied benefit.

EVALUATION OF NEW DEAL 50-PLUS: QUALITATIVE EVIDENCE FROM CLIENTS

J. Atkinson et al

Labour Market Trends, vol.108, 2000, p.427-428

The New Deal 50-plus is a voluntary programme that provides access to one-to-one advice and guidance about finding work through a New Deal Personal Adviser. The programme also provides a wage top-up (the Employment Credit) for a year provided that the recipients total income is less than £15,000, and a training grant. Clients' initial impressions of the programme were very positive. However the key and most attractive element of the programme was the Employment Credit. Few were interested in the training grant and many had not entered the advisory caseload.

MINISTERS PLAN TO WIDEN NET AS JOB PLEDGE IS MET

P. Wintour

Guardian, Nov. 21st 2000, p.12

Reports that the government is planning a major revamp of the New Deal once it has reached its initial target of taking 250,000 young people off of benefits. It will be extended to cover lone parents, the disabled and the older long term unemployed.

NEW DEAL FOR DISABLED PEOPLE: PROSPECTUS

Employment Service

Sheffield: 2000

Describes plans to introduce a network of Job Brokers to work with disabled people and bring them together with employers. They will have the freedom to use innovative approaches to prepare disabled people for work and help them find and retain jobs.

NEW DEAL FOR DISABLED SCHEME

R. Bennett

Financial Times, Nov. 14th 2000, p.6

Companies and voluntary agencies have been invited to bid for government contracts to become job brokers under a New Deal project to help disabled people return to work.

NEW DEAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYED; SURVEY OF EMPLOYERS

J. Hales et al

Labour Market Trends, vol.108, 2000, p.516-518

Most employers felt that their New Deal recruits met their job specification in full (37%) or in part (49%). Virtually all recruits received on the job training and three in five NDYP recruits also had some external training. Sixty-two per cent of recruits were still employed at the end of the employment subsidy. At nine months this had fallen to 51% of NDYP recruits, although 60% of New Deal for Long Term Unemployed People were still employed. Most employers felt that New Deal had no direct impact on their outputs, although two-fifths were more positive about recruiting unemployed people. Most employers felt that recruits had gained work experience, self-esteem and new skills through participation in New Deal.