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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2001): Education - UK - Higher

ACADEMICS COOL ON CASH LURE FOR HIGH FLYERS

D. Firn and M. Wrong

Financial Times, Jan. 3rd 2001, p. 4

Government has offered increased salaries from a £4m fund to retain the UK's star researchers and encourage high fliers from abroad to take up posts in British universities. Most academics feel that the initiative fails to address the wider problem of low salaries in the higher education sector.

LIVING ON CREDIT

A. Phillips

Guardian, Dec. 20th 2000, p. 18

Reports research showing that the abolition of maintenance grants is encouraging students to borrow heavily and mire themselves in debt.

MODELS OF STATE AND MARKET IN THE "MODERNISATION" OF HIGHER EDUCATION

C. Middleton

British Journal of Sociology of Education, vol. 21, 2000, p. 537-554

Higher education in the UK is increasingly regulated by the state yet is simultaneously being opened up to market forces. Through a critical appraisal of the literature on quasi-markets, the free economy and the strong state, neo-liberalism and "steering at a distance", this article identifies three models implicit in the discussion of the modernisation of higher education. The first treats marketisation and state intervention as incompatible strategies for reform, the second argues that the state intervention may contribute to the success of a higher education market economy (thus subordinating the state to the market), while the third proposes that market relations are mobilised in the cause of centralised policy objectives.

STUDENT DEBIT "GETTING OUT OF CONTROL"

R. Smithers

Guardian, Dec. 21st 2000, p. 5

Reports results of a survey showing that in 1998/99 nearly nine of ten students faced financial difficulties. The average student debt was £2,473 compared with £777 in 1995/96. Since 1995/96 students have experienced a 30% drop in grant income and a fall of 17% in regular parental contributions. Two-thirds of respondents said a member of their peer group had opted not to go into higher education because of worries about debt.

THE ULSTER WAY? STUDENT SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND CHOICES UNDER DEVOLUTION

R. Thanki

Regional Studies, vol. 34, 2000, p. 889-893

Presents new data on the impact of the current system of no student support on students at the University of Ulster. Suggests that devolution has given Northern Ireland the opportunity to shape a student support system based on the principle of free higher education and greater financial support for students, replacing the present system of repayable loans for living costs and means-tested tuition fees.