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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2001): Child Welfare - Overseas

ENHANCING PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION IN HONG KONG

N. Rao and M. Koong

International Journal of Early Childhood, vol.32, 2000, p.1-11

Paper presents an overview of pre-school education in Hong Kong. It considers the history of pre-school education, the early childhood curriculum, the training of early childhood professionals and ways in which service standards are monitored. Discusses current problems in early childhood education which include inadequate subsidies to pre-schools, slow progress in teacher training, high adult-child ratios, lack of attention to the transition from pre-school to primary school and the lack of relevant empirical research. Hong Kong needs to move beyond ensuring minimum quality towards investing in high quality programmes of early childhood education and care.

IMPACT OF WELFARE REFORM POLICIES ON CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES: A NATIONAL STUDY

D. Romero, W. Chavkin and P.H. Wise

Journal of Social Issues, vol.56, 2000, p.799-810

Findings from a survey of state CPS (Child Protective Services) Directors indicate the need for continued attention to the potential impact of TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) policies on child welfare. Recommends that TANF and CPS administrators review the safety net programmes that are available to their clients to ensure that loss of financial resources does not result in either increased risk of child neglect or inappropriate investigations of neglect.

THE NEGOTIATION OF CHILD CARE AND EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS AMONG LOW-INCOME PARENTS

J.R. Henly and S. Lyons

Journal of Social Issues, vol.56, 2000, p.683-706

Article aims to explain low-income parents' disproportionate use of informal child care arrangements. Interviews suggest that low-income parents in this sample, regardless of their welfare status and independent of care type, chose their childcare arrangements on the basis of affordability, convenience and safety/quality. Affordability and convenience, more than quality considerations, appeared to explain the preference for informal care.

UNDER COLONIALISM TO DEMOCRATIZATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT IN GHANA

J.W. Morrison

International Journal of Early Childhood, vol.32, 2000, p.24-31

Education of the very young, became a part of the missionary-based education system under colonial rule. It continued after independence but was hampered by lack of financial support from the government. It is accepted that government alone cannot financially support early care and education in Ghana. However the government and private sector have jointly developed an Early Childhood Care and Development Policy. The planned next steps are to solicit national government support to reduce malnutrition and to triple access to early care and education.