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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2001): Social Security - UK - New Deal

BLUNKETT IN NEW DEAL FOR LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYED

B Groom

Financial Times, Jan 17th 2001, p.2

Announces launch of a pilot scheme under which firms would receive a lump sum payment of £1,200 at the start and a further £1,100 after 13 weeks if they take on a young worker from the New Deal scheme. The equivalent sums for over-25s would be £1,000 and £950. This would replace the present system under which companies receive a weekly subsidy for six months.

DOWNTURN WOULD TEST NEW DEAL

R. Taylor

Financial Times, Feb 8th 2001, p.4

Summarises results of research evaluating the effectiveness of Labour's New Deals for the unemployed.

LABOUR MAY REWARD JOB FINDERS WITH £1000

B. Groom

Financial Times, February 6th 2001, p.2

In order to help build up the asset base of the poor, Labour is considering offering £1000 cash gifts to reward hardcore unemployed people who get jobs through its New Deals.

THE NEW DEAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: IMPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT AND THE PUBLIC FINANCES

R. Riley and G. Young

Sheffield: Employment Service, 2000 (ESR 62)

Report considers the overall effects of the New Deal on the economy. Argues that national income is around £˝bn higher as a result of the programme, indicating a welfare gain to the economy as a whole. Estimates that the NDYP had reduced total youth unemployment by about 40,000 and long term youth unemployment by around 45,000. It is considered to have raised youth employment by approximately 15,000 and reduced unemployment among all age groups by 25,000.

NO HOLDS BARRED IN THE STRUGGLE FOR JOBS

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Jan 22nd 2001, p.15

Presents a case study of Working Links, a for-profit company paid by results to get long-term unemployed people back to work in lasting jobs.

PLAYING THE HAND THAT'S BEEN DEALT: VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS, VOLUNTEERS AND THE NEW DEAL

S. Kumleben

Voluntary Action, vol 2, Autumn 2000 p.11-26

Article looks at how far the involvement of New Deal trainees in voluntary organisations represents a threat to the voluntary principle. Finds that although groups can expand their training capacity and increase their complement of full-time workers by taking part in the New Deal, they should manage the introduction of trainees sensitively to avoid alienating or displacing their volunteers. The arrival of New Deal trainees should not be allowed to distract groups from their responsibility to recruit volunteers.

WHAT'S THE DEAL?

R. Winchester

Community Care, no.1357, 2001, p.22-23

Expresses concern that the New Deal for Disabled People has so far creamed off those who were easiest to help without impacting on those with severe needs. As the pilot phase ends and the programme is rolled out nationally, there is concern that flexibility and freedom to innovate may be lost. One in three disabled people who get jobs are unemployed again within the year, pointing to a need for more in work support.