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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2001): Education - UK - Higher

HIGHER EDUCATION'S HAVES AND HAVE NOTS

N Merrick

Public Finance, Feb 16th-22nd 2001, p.14.

Reports that some universities, mainly post-1992 institutions, are failing to attract enough students to fill available places. As a result they can expect to have part of their 2000/01 allocation clawed back by the Higher Education Funding Council.

SHORTAGE OF STUDENTS CLOSES NEW CAMPUSES

J O'Leary

Times, Feb 21st 2001, p.1.

The former polytechnics are finding that as more places are created at traditional universities, students are deserting newer institutions. De Montfort University and Lincoln and Humberside have both responded to falling demand by shutting a campus.

(See also Guardian, Feb 22nd 2001, p.5).

TERTIARY TARGETS MAY FORCE RISE IN FEES

D MacLeod and R Smithers

Guardian, Feb 23rd 2001, p.15

University Vice-Chancellors have again warned the government that elite institutions may opt out of the state system and increase fees charged to students to raise funds. They warn that the present state funding system cannot continue if they are to fulfil the government's targets of 50% of young people participating in higher education and widening access to poor families.

(See also Times, Feb 23rd 2001, p.15; Financial Times, Feb 23rd 2001, p.6).

UNIVERSITIES FALL SHORT OF TARGET FOR NEW STUDENTS

B Russell

Independent, Mar 6th 2001, p.9.

Ministers have pledged to increase student numbers in higher education by 100,000 between 1998 and 2001/02. However figures published by the Higher Education Funding Council for England show that the government is less than half way to its target, with an expansion of 42,321 undergraduates between 1998 and the current academic year.

UNIVERSITIES URGED TO USE US-STYLE APTITUDE TESTS

L Lightfoot

Daily Telegraph, Feb 28th, 2001, p.2.

Universities are being urged to consider a new form of admission test based on mathematical and verbal reasoning, following evidence that talented pupils miss out on places because of weak teaching. Research showed that 30 pupils at low-performing state schools achieved high marks in the aptitude tests, but only one of them went on to get three A grades at A-level.

(See also Financial Times, Feb 28th 2001, p.5; Independent, Feb 28th 2001, p.1; Times, Feb 28th 2001, p.10; Daily Telegraph, Mar 7th 2001, p.25).