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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2001): Education - UK - Schools

10,000 TEACHER POSTS SHOWN VACANT

W Woodward

Guardian, Mar 2nd 2001, p.5.

A survey of 876 secondary schools revealed the existence of 2410 vacancies in February 2001. Across the sector as a whole that would indicate the existence of ca.9969 unfilled teacher posts. A similar survey in September 2000 concluded that 4000 posts were unfilled.

AGENCIES "CASH IN" ON TEACHER SHORTAGES

G Owen and O Wright

Times, Mar 13th 2001, p.8.

Supply agencies have been accused of profiteering from teacher shortages by increasing the prices they charge schools for staff.

"BLAIR AND BLUNKETT HAVE NOT DELIVERED. THE CHILDREN HAVE BEEN BETRAYED".

C Woodhead

Daily Telegraph, March 1st 2001, p.29.

Article comprises vicious personal attacks on Tony Blair and David Blunkett for failing to push through education reforms and promoting a series of initiatives that wasted taxpayers' money and teachers' time. Highlights the government's failure to understand that education is intrinsically valuable, not valuable only because it contributes to the social and economic good of the country.

BLUNKETT THREATENS TEACHERS OVER ACTION

J Judd and S Cassidy

Independent, Mar 13th 2001, p.11.

The Education Secretary has made vague threats of dire consequences for any teachers who take industrial action over staff shortages.

(See also Guardian, Mar 13th 2001, p.5; Independent. Review Supplement, Mar 13th 2001, p.5).

BLUNKETT WARNING TO TEACHERS

N Woolcock

Daily Telegraph, Mar 12th 2001, p.2.

Teachers in the two largest unions (NUT and NAS/UWT) are refusing to cover unfilled posts and staff sickness of more than three days. The Education Secretary is preparing to defy the unions and is considering providing extra funds to cover vacancies by attracting non-union or supply teachers and others living or working abroad.

(See also Independent, Mar 12th 2001, p.11).

CRANKS, CLAPTRAP AND COWARDICE

C Woodhead

Daily Telegraph, Mar 2nd 2001, p.25.

Accuses the government of undermining the national curriculum, failing to implement annual performance appraisals linked to pay for teachers and not dealing effectively with failing local education authorities.

(For comment see Guardian, Mar 2nd 2001, p.7; Independent Review, Mar 2nd 2001, p.5; Guardian, Mar 2nd 2001, p.24).

FEARS OVER WELSH LEA POWERS

C Woodley

Municipal Journal, March 2nd - 8th 2001, p.8.

Welsh councils from now on will be free to choose where to allocate resources in the light of local needs. Teachers fear that the end of ring fencing of budgets will see some local authorities choosing to spend less on education, leading to patchy provision.

FUNDS BOOST FOR SCHOOLS AIMS TO RAISE STANDARDS

Financial Times, Mar 8th 2001, p.24.

Report on the additional funding allocated to schools in this budget and how much money is allocated to schools, recruitment and the PFI programme.

GLASGOW'S CLASS ACT

J McHugh

Public Finance, Feb 23rd - Mar 1st 2001, p.22-23.

Describes how investment by a public-private partnership is modernising Glasgow's schools. A consortium called 3ED will invest 220m in Glasgow's schools, followed by a farther 200m over the 24 year life of the project. In return, Glasgow will pay the consortium 40.5m a year to maintain and operate the school premises.

A LEARNING PROCESS: PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN EDUCATION

R Lissauer and P Robinson (eds.)

London: Institute for Public Policy Research, 2001.

Paper looks at the possible role of the private sector in the management of schools, the evidence on the success or otherwise of education action zones, and the experience of the Private Finance Initiative in schools.

MORE CASH TO LURE BACK TEACHERS AS GOVERNMENT IS ACCUSED OF PANIC

J Kelly

Financial Times, Mar 13th 2001, p.7.

Reports launch of a 200m government initiative to tempt former teachers to return to the classroom. Inducements on offer include "golden welcome backs" of 2000 to 4000 in shortage subjects, and help with costs of housing and childcare.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL EDUCATION: PERSPECTIVE AND PRACTICE

C Murray

Education and Training, vol.43, 2001, p.6-13.

Describes how parents and guardians may be enlisted to actively participate in, and influence in a positive way, the career and educational choice of young people as they leave the compulsory education system.

PUPILS WILL BE SENT HOME DURING TEACHERS' DISPUTE

L Lightfoot

Daily Telegraph, Feb 28th 2001, p.10.

The two largest teaching unions have voted in favour of a ban on covering for vacant posts and long term absences. The action is aimed at highlighting the recruitment crisis in teaching and will result in children having to be sent home.

SCHOOL TEACHERS' REVIEW BODY

Tenth report 2001

London: TSO, 2001 (Cm 4990)

Provides a detailed overview of, and recommendations regarding, teachers' pay and career structures. These include a pay rise of 3.7% for classroom teachers and a minimum starting salary for graduates of 17,001.

SCHOOLS PLAN WINS SUPPORT

A Travis

Guardian, Feb 21st 2001, p.2.

Reports results of a survey showing that, while the principle of comprehensive education remains supported by 72% of voters, 58% support the reintroduction of partial selection by a new generation of specialist schools.

STATE SCHOOL AIMS TO NET 2.5M FROM ONLINE COURSES

J Kelly

Financial Times, Feb 21st 2001, p.1.

Thomas Telford School is expecting to make millions of pounds selling online courses it has developed to other schools. The governors have decided to use the money to develop the school, education in the region and specialist schools in the wider community (City Academies)

STOP PICKING ON PIMLICO

E Singh

Public Finance, Feb 23rd - Mar 1st 2001, p.30.

Since the governors of Pimlico School abandoned Private Finance negotiations after five years, they have been under attack from Westminster Council.

TEACHER LOAN PLAN IS ILLEGAL

Anon

Times, Feb 19th 2001, p.8.

A government plan to encourage graduates to become teachers by paying off their student loans may breach European Union law and therefore have to be abandoned.

TEACHER TRAINING APPLICANTS UP 19%

W Woodward

Guardian, Mar 7th 2001, p.7.

Applications for teacher training courses are up 19% in England and Wales compared to March 2000.

TEACHER UNIONS UNITE IN PROTEST

G Owen

Times, Mar 9th 2001, p.2.

The four main teacher unions have agreed to debate the same motion at their conferences, calling for an independent inquiry into pay and conditions. Failure by the Government to set up an inquiry or take other appropriate action will lead to industrial action to limit the working week of members to 35 hours. The unions claim that the current shortage of teachers is putting unacceptable pressure on those who remain in the classroom.

(See also Guardian, Mar 9th 2001, p.11.)

UNRULY PUPILS TO BE GIVEN ARMY TRAINING

Anon

Daily Telegraph, Mar 7th 2001, p.12.

Reports plans to hire former military instructors to teach disaffected teenagers practical skills in a government funded experiment.

MY THREE-POINT PLAN FOR THE NEXT EDUCATION SECRETARY

C Woodhead

Daily Telegraph, Mar 5th 2001, p.20.

Sets out a plan for school reform which involves:

  • cutting regulation and bureaucracy;
  • establishing the true purpose of education as being to impart subject knowledge to children;
  • giving up on "glitz and spin".