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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2001): Medical Professions - UK - Regulation

FOR OUR EYES ONLY

K. Walshe

Health Service Journal, vol.111, Feb 22nd 2001, p.26-27

The NHS Litigation Authority has a great deal of information on individual doctors that should be made available to trusts in order to ensure patient safety. The Authority is so focused on managing clinical negligence cases that it neglects its wider mission to serve the NHS. It should be reformed to make it more accountable.

GMC PREPARES FOR HUGE DRIVE TO CLEAR 200 CONDUCT CASES

P. Stephenson

Health Service Journal, vol.111, Feb 22nd 2001, p.8

Summarises the General Medical Council's plans to speed up its handling of complaints, reform its governance structure and collaborate more closely with health authorities and trusts.

NUMBER OF NURSES STRUCK OFF UP BY HALF

J. Carvel

Guardian, Mar 7th 2001, p.5

The number of nurses struck off the professional register rose by 50% in 2000 as the authorities responded to increased complaints from hospital managers, patients and relatives.

ONE DOCTOR SUSPENDED PER WEEK UNDER POST-SHIPMAN POWERS

J. Laurance

Independent, Mar 6th 2001, p.1

Reports that one doctor a week is being banned from practising by the General Medical Council under emergency powers introduced in response to the Shipman case. These emergency suspensions reflect the gravity of the allegations against the doctors and are made pending a full disciplinary hearing.

WHO RULES? THE NEW POLITICS OF MEDICAL REGULATION

B. Salter

Social Science and Medicine, vol.52, 2001, p.871-883

The recent politicisation of medical regulation in the UK has destabilised the historic relationship between medicine, society and the state. The medical profession has responded to a series of scandals by proposing a reformed version of self-regulation. This is insufficient to secure the trust of an increasingly sceptical public. Government, on the other hand, wishes to impose a bureaucratic apparatus to ensure public accountability. Argues that the medical profession should seek active alliances with consumer interests in health to pre-empt the government's attempt to impose its bureaucratic agenda.