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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2001): Mental Health Services - UK

THE BOTTOM LINE: INCENTIVES AND DIS-INCENTIVES FOR A WIDER RANGE OF HOUSING AND SUPPORT OPTIONS

K Simons

Housing, Care and Support, vol.4, Feb 2001, p.20-26.

If we want commissioners to shift their purchasing strategies to include a wider range of housing and support options for people with learning difficulties, we have to ensure there are consistent financial incentives for them to do so. For the national learning disability strategy to be successful in introducing significant change, some of the inconsistencies in areas like Supporting People, out of area placements and the Independent Living Fund will have to be addressed.

DANGEROUS ASSUMPTIONS

R Winchester

Community Care, no.1361, 2001, p.20-21

The government is proposing that "dangerous" people with "untreatable" personality disorders should be detained indefinitely against their will. Mental health groups claim this could result in many harmless people losing their liberty, and that the condition does in fact respond to some kinds of treatment.

DETAINED: SSI INSPECTION OF COMPULSORY MENTAL HEALTH ADMISSIONS

Social Services Inspectorate

London: Department of Health, 2000

Presents a critique of social care offered to people compulsorily detained under mental health legislation. While approved social wokers are highly valued for their knowledge and skills, and interagency working is generally good, the report raises serious concerns over care planning, case management, information provision and the treatment of ethnic minority groups in mental health assessments. It also highlights the lack of integration between the health service's care programme approach and social services departments' care management.

EVALUATION OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MENTAL HEALTH REVIEW IN SOMERSET: RESULTS AFTER FIFTEEN MONTHS OF DATA COLLECTION

P Gulliver, E Peck and D Towell.

Managing Community Care, vol.9, Feb 2001, p.14-21.

Paper presents the results from the evaluation of the implementation of joint commissioning and combined provision of mental health services in Somerset. Comparisons with baseline data are made and key emerging questions are identified.

NEW DIRECTIONS: REVIEW OF THE MENTAL HEALTH (SCOTLAND) ACT 1984.

Chairman: Bruce Millan.

Scottish Executive

2001 (SE/2001/56).

Proposes changes to the Mental Health (Scotland) Act 1984. Suggested new powers will allow the transfer to prison of patients deemed to be dangerous when their medical treatment is finished or refused. Mental health hearings considering compulsory detention will be passed to an independent tribunal rather than sherriff courts. Compulsory treatment, to be used as a last resort, is to be extended to the community.

TIME TO DESIGN UPWARDS IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR OLDER PEOPLE

T Goss

Working with Older People, vol.5, Jan 2001, p.27-30.

Four main areas of working need improvement if services for older people with mental health needs are to match the aspirations of the National Service Framework for Older People and the NHS Plan. These are:

  • effective care management strategies;
  • more responsive and flexible care;
  • making the best use of resources; and
  • creating effective partnerships between health and social services.