Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2001): Social Security - UK - New Deal

BLAIR'S £1.5 BN ADULT LITERACY DRIVE

P. Wintour and W. Woodward

Guardian, March 1st 2001, p. 13

As part of a drive to raise basic literacy skills, government is proposing that, as a condition of receiving benefit, the illiterate unemployed or claimants on the New Deal be required to attend basic reading and writing courses.

EVALUATING WELFARE TO WORK FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

T. Hyland and D. Musson

Education and Training, vol. 43, 2001, p. 25-29

After two years of operation, the New Deal for Young People has been extensively evaluated both by official government and independent researchers. In future the NDYP will need to target more difficult clients with problems of illiteracy, drug abuse and criminal records. This means that more time will need to be allowed at the gateway stage to deal with severe basic skills and motivational problems and stronger links formed with post-school vocational education and training.

LABOUR PLANS TO EXTEND EMPLOYMENT ZONES

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Feb. 28th 2001, p. 4

Research has shown that Employment Action Zones deliver twice as many jobs for the long term unemployed as the conventional New Deal for the over 25s, and at the same cost. The government therefore has plans to extend the contracts for the zones, if it wins a second term in office.

ONE EVALUATIONS NEED REFOCUSSING

L. Britton

Working Brief, no. 121, 2001, p. 10-12

Research shows that some claimants were discouraged from using the ONE pilot services by fears about being forced into work. While there is substantial evidence that the tailored service offered by ONE personal advisers was helpful and liked by participants, there is no evidence that the schemes have diverted a significant number of clients away from benefits and into work.

RECRUITING UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE

Education and Employment Committee

London: TSO, 2001 (House of Commons papers. Session 2000/01; HC 48)

Identifies two significant barriers to the recruitment of unemployed people: inadequate skills on the part of the unemployed an indirectly discriminatory recruitment practices on the part of employers. Proposals for overcoming these barriers include: expansion of opportunities for work trials and placements; more post-placement support; evolution of the Employment Service into a demand-led agency serving employers and the unemployed equally; and expansion of the role of employers in employment assistance.

TRAINING FOR JOBLESS WILL HELP MEET SKILLS SHORTAGES

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Mar. 8th 2001, p. 5

Discusses government plans to address skills shortages including a tough new approach aimed at getting the "hard to employ" back to work. Gordon Brown has hinted that there maybe a new tax credit regime for employers or employees. Details are also about to be published regarding support for employer led initiatives and better workplace training.