Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2001): Social Security - Overseas

MATERNITY AND PARENTAL BENEFITS IN CANADA: ARE THERE BEHAVIOURAL IMPLICATIONS?

S. A. Phipps

Canadian Public Policy, vol. 26, 2000, p. 415-434

Paper uses micro data from the 1988/89/90 Labour Market Activities Survey to study some behavioural implications of the Canadian maternity/parental benefits system. Finds that, in general, women do not have babies in order to take advantage of the programme. There is also no evidence that they increase their hours of paid work to gain access to benefits. Teenage mothers, women with little education and those experiencing difficulty in the labour market are less likely to be eligible for benefits. Given the evidence on lack of significant behavioural response, it would seem reasonable to ease access to the programme.

A (MODEST) PROPOSAL FOR EXPANDING SOCIAL CITIZENSHIP IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

P. C. Schmitter and M. W. Bauer

Journal of European Social Policy, vol. 11, 2001, p. 55-65

Proposes payment of a Euro-stipendium each month to all citizens or legal permanent residents living within the European Union whose total earnings amount to less than a third of the average income of everyone living within its borders.

STATE INTERVENTION AND MENTAL WELL-BEING AMONG THE UNEMPLOYED

M. Strandh

Journal of Social Policy, vol. 30, 2001, p. 57-80

Article investigates how unemployment benefit systems and active labour market policy measures affect mental well-being among the unemployed in Sweden. The study used data from a longitudinal survey of 3,500 unemployed Swedes. Three different types of active labour market policy measures involving the unemployed were studied: activation, vocational training and workplace participation measures. Of these, only involvement in workplace participation had a clear positive effect on mental well-being. Of the two Swedish unemployment benefit systems, only access to the more generous income replacement unemployment benefits had a positive effect. This effect was accentuated if unemployment was prolonged.