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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2001): Welfare State - UK

A CHRISTIAN SOCIAL POLICY FOR TODAY

M. Torry

Crucible, Oct./Dec. 2000, p. 214-217

Advocates universal, rather than targeted welfare provision as seen in the NHS, Child Benefit and a proposed future Citizen's Income. This would be a small, unconditional and non-withdrawable income paid to every citizen and funded by reducing means-tested and national insurance benefits and tax allowance.

EVALUATING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LOCAL COMPACTS

York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2001 (Findings; 251)

Many local authorities, other public sector bodies and voluntary and community organisations have begun to develop local compacts and codes for co-operation. Research team has been tracking local compacts in ten case study areas. Interim report looks at the lessons emerging from local compacts and their implications for other forms of partnerships.

THE EVOLUTION OF DEVOLUTION

D. Fraser and N. Speed

Housing, Mar. 2001, p. 21-22

Looks at the effect of Scottish and Welsh devolution on various aspects of social policy, including social housing, education and health.

HALIFAX OPPOSES ACCOUNT PLANS FOR POOR

J. Mackintosh and R. Bennett

Financial Times, Apr. 10th 2001, p. 2

All of the large banks except the Halifax have dropped their opposition to allowing sub-post offices to offer their accounts as part of the planned new service for the poor. The banks have agreed to pay up to £16m a year each to fund the service.

LABOUR'S £500M BOOST FOR GPs AND TEACHERS

J. Kelly and N. Timmins

Financial Times, Mar. 19th 2001, p. 4

David Blunkett is to announce £400m in next year's education budget for training and recruitment of teaching assistants. At the same time Tony Blair is to promise further efforts to increase GP numbers by announcing a £100m plan (£10,000 for each GP practice) to modernise the service. Both speeches come at difficult times for both professions which are facing staff shortages and retention problems.

(See also Independent, Mar. 19th 2001, p. 11)

LIB DEMS LOOK TO 2005 POLICIES

G. Hurst

Times, Mar. 19th 2001, p. 2

The Liberal Democrats are planning future policies based on decentralising both the delivery and financing of education, health and police services in an attempt to shed their tax-and-spend party image. The Party is likely to advocate local income taxes to pay for devolved services.

AL LITTLE LOCAL DIFFICULTY

T. Travers

Guardian, Apr. 11th 2001, p. 17

Argues that tight central control is unavoidable if we wish to achieve territorial equity in the delivery of public services such as health and social care and education.

PREVENTING SOCIAL EXCLUSION

Social Exclusion Unit

London: 2001

Reports that the government's drive to tackle social exclusion is beginning to work. Teenage pregnancy, rough sleeping and school exclusions have all gone down, but the number of truancies remains constant. The proportion of children in homes where no-one is in work has fallen from 17.9% in 1997 to 15.1. GCSE results improved fastest in some of the most deprived areas between 1998 and 2000 and faster for black pupils than all pupils. Unemployment has fallen faster than the national average in 19 out of the 20 worst affected areas.

REFORMULATING WELFARE

J. Atherton

Cruible, Oct./Dec. 2000, p. 218-223

Acknowledges that welfare provision continues to be a central role of the nation state. Advocates a move to stakeholder welfare which would promote an inclusive society, require a reformulated understanding of civil society, foster personal responsibility, and encourage individual participation and enterprise.