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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2001): Social Security - UK - New Deal

"EMPLOYMENT FIRST" AT HEART OF NEW DEAL MARK II

P. Bivand

Working Brief, no. 123, 2001, p. 10-13

Summarises the government's proposals for developing the New Deals in any second term in office. The proposals mark the return of the concept of full employment as a viable policy aim, and introduce the concept of Employment First. This means putting people into some form of supported employment while at the same time seeking to improve their skills. Government also aims to broaden welfare-to-work programmes to focus more on unemployed adults. The new Working Age Agency will provide a "one-stop-shop" for processing all of the benefit claims of people of working age, and helping them to access training and job opportunities.

FAMILY FRIENDLY POLICIES NEEDED

L. Britton

Working Brief, no. 123, 2001, p. 20-21

The absence of family-friendly policies in the work place and lack of affordable child care are discouraging lone parents from entering employment. Article discusses a range of government initiatives aimed at overcoming these problems.

web linkNO MORE SKIVVY SCHEMES? ACTIVE LABOUR MARKET POLICIES AND THE BRITISH NEW DEAL FOR THE YOUNG UNEMPLOYED IN CONTEXT (PDF format)

J. Van Reenen

London: Institute of Fiscal Studies, 2001 (Working paper; 01/09)

Study compared Employment Service performance in New Deal pilot and non-pilot areas. Concludes that unemployed young men are about 20% more likely to get a job as a result of the policy. Each extra job costs the exchequer about £4,000. Savings in unemployment and housing benefits and the extra tax and National Insurance paid by those who move into work outweigh that, producing an annual saving of about £50m. The long term success of the programme will however depend on its ability to enhance the employability and productivity of people going through the options.