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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2001): Social Care - UK

ACTS OF FAITH

T. Philpot

Community Care, no.1370, 2001, p.25-26

The Conservative Party is advocating a central role for faith communities in the delivery of social care. This policy is based on ideas about "compassionate conservatism" developed in the US by Mervin Olasky. Article points out that faith communities in the UK lack manpower, resources and expertise to take on large scale social care delivery. There is also a danger that they would attempt to proselytise the people accessing their services, and want to impose their own moral values.

BETTER CARE FOR ALL OUR FUTURES

Scottish Executive Health Department

2001

Sets out proposals to legislate on:

  • joint resourcing and management of community care services by the NHS and local authorities;
  • promotion of consistency in charging for non-residential care;
  • promotion of choice in residential and non-residential care provision.

There are proposals to allow residents to make additional payments so that they can enter a more expensive care home than their funding from their local authority allows.

DEGREE OF HOPE AS DIPLOMA IS SET TO BITE THE DUST

M. Hunter

Community Care, no.1367, 2001, p12

The Diploma in Social Work is to be replaced by a vocational degree as the entry level qualification for the profession. It is hoped that this will boost recruitment and improve the reputation of the profession.

HEALTH AND PROBATION GAIN BENEFIT OF SKILLS DRAIN

R. Winchester

Community Care, no.1370, 2001, p.12-13

An informal survey by Essex Council has found evidence a growing exodus of social care staff, particularly middle and senior managers, to the health service, where pay is better.

LEAPS OF FAITH

L. Maggs

Third Sector, Apr. 21st 2001, p.9

Discusses proposals from both the Labour and Conservative parties to use faith groups to provide social services on the cheap. This is inappropriate because religious beliefs and practices could intrude into the work of faith groups; and they would be prone to using public funds to proselytise.

MAKE THE EVIDENCE COUNT

F. Rickford

Community Care, no.1368, 2001, p.18-19

Discusses the planned Social Care Institute for Excellence, which is to issue evidence-based good practice guidelines to social care professionals.

MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE

T. Goadby

Community Care, no.1367, 2001, p.26-27

The government is proposing that all social care staff have access to training leading to qualifications. Article reports the results of a study showing that providers consistently assign low importance to qualifications, placing greater emphasis on the experience, attitude and availability of employees.

SOCIAL WORK INSTITUTE SET FOR DEMISE

L. Revans

Community Care, no.1371, 2001, p.4-5

Reports that the National Institute for Social Work is set to close down and transfer its functions to the new Social Care Institute for Excellence.

SOCIAL WORKERS TO JOIN HOMES SCHEME

C. Laurent

Community Care, no.1371, 2001, p.10-11

Reports that the government's Starter Homes Initiative launched in July 2000 will be open to social workers, making them eligible for low-cost home ownership.

SOLVING THE CARE PUZZLE

R. Hannaford

Public Finance, Apr. 27th-May 3rd 2001, p.18-20

The Health and Social Care Bill gives the Department of Health the right to impose integrated arrangements on health and social care organisations through Care Trusts. These are NHS organisations to which local authority functions in respect to social care provision are delegated. Article surveys various existing models of health and social care integration.

WORLDS APART

A.U. Sale

Community Care, no.1371, 2001, p.20

Local authorities are seeking to ease staff shortages by recruiting social workers from overseas, from countries like South Africa and Australia. Article discusses ethical aspects of this policy.