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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2001): Welfare State - Overseas

THE DUTCH MODEL: AN OBVIOUS CANDIDATE FOR THE "THIRD WAY"

A. Hemerijck and J. Visser

Archives Européennes de Sociologie, vol.42, 2001, p.221-239

Article analyses the Dutch model of political economy which involves a combination of fiscal conservatism, wage moderation, consensual welfare reform, job creation and the maintenance of overall social security. Begins by presenting a comparative account of labour market performance over the past decade. Then analyses in detail three consecutive policy shifts in three interrelated domains of industrial relations, social security and labour market policy since the early 1980s. Finally considers general lessons that can be learned from the Dutch experience of negotiated adjustment and welfare reform.

EXPERTISE, ADVOCACY AND DELIBERATION: LESSONS FROM WELFARE REFORM

M.J. Bane

Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, vol.20, 2001, p.191-197

Author reflects on the role of policy research in making public policy and on the responsibilities of policy researchers in the democratic process, using welfare reform in the US as an example.

PHILANTHROPY AND THE DIVERSIFICATION OF THE WESTERN EUROPEAN "WELFARE STATE" MODEL

T.N.M. Schuyt

European Journal of Social Work, vol.4, 2001, p.39-44

Proposes that four new models be added to the existing welfare state model of government provision of services paid for by taxation. They are: the insurance model, the occupational welfare model, the primary network model and the philanthropy model, the last of which is discussed in more detail. Concludes with a discussion of whether welfare functions currently being divested by government will in fact be taken over by other parties such as family or charitable organisations.

SOCIAL CITIZENSHIP AND A RECONSTRUCTED TOCQUEVILLE

C.A. Goldberg

American Sociological Review, vol.66, 2001, p.289-315

Explores the implications of Tocqueville's theory of democracy for current debates about social citizenship and the welfare state. A careful reading of his works indicates that Tocqueville advocated enabling rather that tutelary social policies; universal rather than targeted benefits; preventive rather than compensatory interventions; and an associative welfare state based on partnership.

SOCIAL POLICY DEVELOPMENTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOCIAL PROFESSIONS: THE CASE OF POLAND

J. Krzyszkowski

Social Work in Europe, vol.8, 2001, p.62-64

Discusses devolution as the main tendency of social policy reform in Poland in the 1990s, and the implications of this for professionals. Key elements in devolution are:

  • local partnerships of public and private agencies, community members and service users to combat social problems;
  • effectiveness and efficiency of social services achieved by a process of marketisation (contracting out).

STATES IN TRANSITION: FAMILY AND HEALTH CARE POLICY IN MOLDOVA

S. Imbrogno

International Social Work, vol.44, 2001, p.211-227

The Moldovan government is expected to modernise a social and health care system that was originally centrally planned and directed from Moscow. Moldova has embarked upon the transformation of its political and economic institutions. Legislation has been criticised for diverting funding needed to alleviate poverty into building a market economy. Government policy depends on how problems are conceptualised and their causes analysed, whether critical social dimensions are taken seriously and on the degree to which the public and private sectors in the human services are integrated through the social work profession.