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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2001): Social Care - UK

CAUGHT IN THE ACT?

A.U. Sale

Community Care, no. 1372, 2001, p.20-21

Explores the impact of the Human Rights Acts on Social Services. A total of 109 cases had made challenges under the Act between October 2000 and May 2001. Claims for a breach of human rights were upheld in 15 of these. The Act made absolutely no difference in 53 of the cases and affected the outcome of 56.

COMMISSIONING FOR QUALITY: TEN YEARS OF SOCIAL CARE MARKETS IN ENGLAND

M. Knapp, B. Hardy and J. Forder

Journal of Social Policy, vol.30, 2001, p. 283-306

Article discusses the social care markets' policy and performance frameworks during the 1990's. It looks at purchasers, objection and accommodation, and local authority purchasing power; providers, the intersectoral balance, the residential-domicilary balance, the service range, provider motivations and behaviour; commissioning and contract type; care planning and delivery and users and carers. Continues by questioning the future - is social care different; are transaction costs too high; can social care markets improve efficiency?; Is there a price-quality trade off and will commissioning arrangements mature.

DIRECTORS WELCOME U-TURN ON CARE TRUSTS LEGISLATION

Anon.

Community Care, no.1372, 2001, p.5

Government has withdrawn the clause requiring the establishment of a care trust in the event of social care failure from the Health and Social Care Bill. However powers for government to force the creation of partnerships between health and social care in the event of service failure remain intact.

FAITH IN THE FUTURE

T. Burke

Young People Now, Issue 146, 2001, p.8-9

Investigates recent moves by politicians to get religious groups more involved in providing welfare services. There are concerns that these trends might threaten the diversity of public provision. Faith groups themselves do not wish to become a cheap alternative to public welfare services.

FUTURE IMPERFECT?: REPORT OF THE KING'S FUND INQUIRY INTO CARE AND SUPPORT WORKERS

M. Henwood

London: King's Fund, 2001

Care workers are among the worst paid in Britain, earning around £5.25 per hour. Most have little training and two thirds have no qualifications. Without improvements, care and support services could face a severe recruitment crisis.

HOLYROOD'S GIFT TO WESTMINISTER

R. McKay

Community Care, no.1375, 2001, p.28

Devolution has changed the political landscape in Scotland, bringing social care to the forefront of public debate and political controversy.

IN POLL POSITION

R. Downey

Community Care, no.1375, 2001, p.20-22

A survey of 200 social care staff showed some dissatisfaction with the Labour government's record. However the majority thought that social care would be safer in Labour's hands than in those of the Conservatives.

NICE PROCESS, BUT DID JOINT COMMISSIONING CHANGE ANYONE'S LIFE

R. Greig and R. Poxton

Managing Community Care, vol.9, Apr. 2001, p.16-21

Presents a review of published studies of joint commissioning of health and social care in practice. Concludes that there is little solid evidence that the process leads to benefits for service users, but that there is evidence of its resulting in improved inter-agency working.

ON THE RECORD

J. Pearce and B. Jordan

Community Care, no. 1373, 2001, p.20-22

Summarises the Labour government's many new initiatives in the field of social care introduced between 1997 and 2001, with analysis and comment.

THE ROAD IS CLEAR

R. Downey

Community Care, no. 1375, 2001, p.23-26

Labour Party policy focuses on integration of health and social care, pointing to the demise of social services departments. Article also summarises Conservative and Liberal Democrat policies on social care.

A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TO PLANNING HOUSING AND SOCIAL CARE; IF NOT NOW, WHEN?

M. Foord and P. Simic

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.9, 2001, p.168-176

Research identified a number of "critical success factors" in developing a viable, sustainable system for joint working between housing and social services. Main areas identified were: effective joint planning; an understanding of agency roles and boundaries; the incorporation of user views into planning; and interagency training. Analysis revealed a fundamental need for a new configuration of services to tackle an existing culture of mistrust.

WE'RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER

R. Winchester and P. Gilroy

Community Care, no.1374, 2001, p.20-22

Discusses ways in which social workers across Europe are liaising, collaborating and exchanging best practice. Presents a case study of joint working between Kent Social Services and EU nations.

WOULD YOU BUY COMMUNITY CARE FROM THESE MEN?

C. Laurent

Community Care, no.1373, 2001, p.12-13

Summarises the main parties' policy proposals on social welfare and examines their implications for future provision.