Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2001): National Health Service - Funding

ADVISOR SUGGESTS COMPULSORY HEALTH INSURANCE

R Sylvester

Daily Telegraph, Jul.17th 2001, p.4.

Reports on the idea of introducing a continental-style compulsory social insurance scheme to pay for National Health Services. Article discusses systems in place in other European countries.

BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY

A McGauran

Health Service Journal, vol.III, July 5th 2001, p.13-15.

Discusses the pros and cons of a tariff system as an instrument for controlling the NHS's escalating compensation bill. Such a system would set specific amounts of compensation for particular circumstances, with payouts where there is clear evidence of negligence, but without the need to prove liability.

CUT AND RUN

J Appleby

Health Service Journal, vol.III, July 5th 2001, p.33-34.

Government claims that the NHS will have saved £1bn in management costs by the end of this financial year are exaggerated. Published figures on savings since 1997/98 vary considerably. The question of what level of management costs the NHS should be expected to bear to run efficiently needs to be addressed.

DOCTORS WARN MINISTERS ON NHS FUNDING

C Hall

Daily Telegraph, July 2nd 2001, p.4.

Doctors' leaders have outlined the conditions under which they would accept private sector input into the NHS. Public-private partnerships must offer benefits to patient care, give value for money and not devalue the NHS workforce or resources.

(See also Times, July 2nd 2001, p.4; Financial Times, July 2nd 2001, p.2).

THE FINANCE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN HEALTH CARE

A Harrison and B New

Health Care UK, Spring 2001, p.26-44.

This paper focuses on the use of public funds to finance the NHS Research and Development programme along with other health related research projects. It examines the public and private roles; how much is spent and by whom. It also locks briefly at issues of policy development and the composition of the public role.

KINNOCK CALLS FOR SPECIAL NHS TAX

S Hattenstone and L Ward

Guardian; July 2nd 2001, p.1.

Former Labour Party leader Neil Kinnock has claimed that the crisis in the NHS is now so severe that government should introduce a ring-fenced tax to fund it or risk a gradual slide towards private care.

PAYING YOUR OWN WAY

L Gitter

Health Which?, June 2001, p.10-13.

Discusses the pros and cons of paying for private treatment to avoid long NHS waiting lists and high premiums for private medical insurance. Researchers found large variations in price between hospitals.

SHOULD PRIVATE MEDICAL INSURANCE BE SUBSIDISED?

C Emmerson, C Frayne and A Goodman

Health Care UK, Spring 2001, p.48-63.

Discusses the growing importance of the private health care sector as the NHS continues to deal with an ever increasing demand. It asks the question as to whether the government should encourage growth in the Private Medical Insurance Market (PMI). It goes on to examine:

  • public and private sector spending on health;
  • private medical insurance in the UK;
  • characteristics of those with private medical insurance in the UK;
  • whether a subsidy to PMI could be self-financing.

SHOW PATIENTS THE BILL AND FIND A WAY FOR THEM TO PAY IT

C Powell

Daily Telegraph, Jul. 17th 2001, p.20.

Discusses how Labour has staked its reputation on the fundamental improvement of public services. Focusing on the delivery of health services it discusses how we can all be persuaded to pay the necessary greater amount to get the standard of service we all want.

It examines other European health services which are financed by compulsory social insurance schemes. It puts forward the idea of smart cards, or presenting customers with a copy of the bill for their treatment so that people are aware of the costs involved.

UNHEALTHY CHARGES: CAB EVIDENCE ON THE IMPACT OF HEALTH CHARGES

L Phelps

London: National Association of Citizens' Advice Bureaux, 2001.

Reports that many people are putting their health at risk because they cannot afford to pay prescription charges to obtain essential medicines. A study conducted by MORI revealed that around 750,000 people in England and Wales fail to get their prescriptions dispensed because of the cost. A separate survey of Citizens' Advice Bureau clients showed that 28% of those who had to pay charges failed to get all or part of their prescriptions dispensed because of the cost. Argues that there is a strong case for the complete abolition of charges. Failing this, the scheme should be amended by pricing the prescription prepayment certificate on a sliding scale.

WEALTHY AND HEALTHY: CHARITABLE FUNDS IN HEALTH PROVISION TODAY

C Pharoah and I Mocraft

Health Care UK, Spring 2001, p.22-25.

One of the aims of the National Health Service (NHS) was to replace a system of health care dependent on charity. 50 years on the system still needs charitable gifts. This article discusses the findings of a study which looks at sources of charitable funds, what is included and excluded in this definition, how charitable funds are used and the dependence of research on such funds.