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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2001): Social Care - Overseas

EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF LEGAL CHANGE ON NON-PROFIT AND FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS: THE CASE OF THE ISRAELI LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE LAW

H. Schmid

Public Management Review, vol. 3, 2001, p. 167-189

Article evaluates the impact of legal change on non-profit and for-profit organizations providing home care services mandated in the Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law. Considerable dependence on government funding provided for in the Law forces these organizations to adopt behaviour that conforms to government policies and standards for service provision. Moreover, the growing tendency towards mimetic behaviour and the increasing proportion of professional workers in both sectors causes for-profit and non-profit organizations to adopt similar bureaucratic behaviour and organizational structures.

WHAT HAPPENED TO LONG-TERM CARE IN THE HEALTH REFORM DEBATE OF 1993-1994? LESSONS FOR THE FUTURE

J. M. Wiener et al

Milbank Quarterly, vol. 79, 2001, p. 207-252

During 1993 and 1994 the United States debated but did not enact major health care reform. Although reform efforts focused on providing health coverage for the uninsured and controlling acute care costs, many proposals included substantial long-term care initiatives. President Clinton proposed creating a substantial home care programme for severely disabled people of all ages and income groups, among several other initiatives. By stressing non-means-tested public programmes, the President's plan was a major departure from the Medicaid-dominated financing system for long-term care. Analysing the political and intellectual history of long-term care during the health reform debate provides lessons for future reform.