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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2001): Education - UK - Higher

AN EXAM SYSTEM THAT CANNOT MAKE THE GRADE

T Hames

Times, Aug 9th 2001, p.14.

Article discusses the changes in attitude towards education in Britain and the exchanging of one flawed philosophy for another in the last twenty years. It explores the ideas surrounding increased participation in higher education, and discusses the government's policy that half of all 18 year olds should enter higher education by 2010.

LABOUR STICKS TO UNIVERSITY TARGETS PLEDGE

E Rigby

Financial Times, Aug. 17th 2001, p.3.

An estimated 9,500 university places are expected to be unfilled in 2001. In spite of this government will fund a further 28,500 extra places in 2002-2003 in pursuit of its target of getting 50% of all young people into higher education by 2010.

A LESSON FROM AMERICA

W Buiter

Financial Times, July 25th 2001, p.17.

Proposes that UK universities should be given full financial autonomy, with freedom to charge tuition fees and determine staff pay. To prevent this discriminating against students from poor backgrounds, author suggests either instituting a system of student loans financed through a graduate tax or providing generous means-tested scholarships.

THE NEW UNIVERSITY CHALLENGE

J Kingman

Daily Telegraph, Aug. 1st 2001, p.17.

Proposes a system under which universities would be able to charge economic fees for their courses. Means tested scholarships would be available for students from poorer families to offset both fees and living costs.

STUDENTS OWE AN AVERAGE OF 6,000 AS DEBTS GROW

S Cassidy

Independent, July 27th 2001, p.10.

Reports results of a survey by Barclays Bank showing that student debt increased from an average £4,339 per undergraduate in 2000 to £5,961 in 2001.

WELCOME TO THE AGE OF THE BOG STANDARD UNIVERSITY

C Woodhead

Daily Telegraph, Aug. 16th 2001, p.20.

Argues that the supply of university places has outstripped demand to the point that anyone who applies will be accepted somewhere, regardless of qualifications. Good A-levels have therefore become unnecessary to gain admission.

WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T CALL IT A TAX

R Hattersley

Guardian, Aug. 6th 2001, p.6.

Article discusses a possible review of student loans for both maintenance and tuition fees and replacing them with a graduate tax.