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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2001): Social Security - UK - New Deal

EMPLOYMENT SERVICE HITS ITS TARGETS

P. Bivand

Working Brief, issue 126, 2001, p.12-13

Discusses the Employment Service's performance in 2000/01 and how its targets differ for 2001/02.

THE GREAT AMERICAN JOB HUNT

M. McHale

Public Finance, July 13th-19th 2001, p.22-24

Introduces Working Links, a for-profit company which operates in nine of the government's 15 Employment Zones and in the New Deal Programme. Its approach is to place people in jobs rather than in education or training, and to offer them support in remaining in employment. If a client walks out on the job, the company forfeits its fee.

INCLUDING PARTNERS OF THE UNEMPLOYED

L. Britton

Working Brief, issue 126, 2001, p.14-16

The New Deal for Partners of the Unemployed has failed to generate interest among its target group. Research suggests this may be because it lacks the incentives and subsidies offered by the other New Deals and provides only job-focussed interviews with a personal advisor. The programme is also the only New Deal which does not have an Annual Performance Agreement target, the lack of which provides little incentive for proactive approaches by staff.

LAST IN, FIRST OUT

C. Denny and H. Stewart

Guardian, Aug. 14th 2001, p.13

Argues that the New Deal for the Young Unemployed has boosted economic growth in the UK by 0.1% per annum, by increasing the employment rate at which the economy can grow without inflation. Bringing the unemployed back into the labour market reduces upward pressure on wages and so creates extra jobs. These effects should persist even when unemployment starts to bite. The impact of the New Deal should give the Bank of England more latitude to cut interest rates to boost growth and stave off recession without stoking inflation.

RE-ENGINEERED NEW DEAL 25+ STARTS AFRESH

P. Bivand

Working Brief, issue 126, 2001, p.8-9

The New Deal 25+ was re-engineered with effect from April 2001. Adults aged 25 and above became eligible for the New Deal after claiming Jobseekers Allowance for 18 months instead of two years. The programme has also become more intensive and involves a greater mandatory element. Statisticians are treating the pre-April 2001 and post-April 2001 programmes as different for monitoring purposes.

WORKING PARENTHOOD AND PARENTAL OBLIGATION

H. Dean

Critical Social Policy, Vol.21, 2001, p.267-286

Article reports on aspects of a small-scale qualitative study of low-income working parents. The research was conducted in the context of attempts by the British government to promote the labour force participation of low-income parents, especially mothers, through its "welfare-to-work" initiatives. Findings show that mothers in low income families can find re-entering the labour market difficult in terms of the practical obstacles, moral dilemmas and ideological pressures involved. Without additional measures to support them in relation to their parental obligations, low paid women are being pressed to exchange familial dependency for economic exploitation.