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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2001): Social Housing - UK

"BAD" LANDLORDS FACE CASH PENALTIES

P. Webster

Times, Aug. 3rd 2001, p.4

Private landlords who fail to maintain their properties or control unruly tenants may be liable for severe financial penalties under new government proposals. These could include loss of entitlement to the housing benefit which can currently be paid directly to them.

(See also Financial Times, Aug. 4th 2001, p.4).

COUNCIL TENANTS MAY BE GIVEN CASH NEST EGG

P. Webster

Times, Aug. 2nd 2001, p.4

Reports government plans to give social housing tenants cash bonuses if they decide to move. Under the scheme, a proportion of a householder's rent would be placed in a fund held in his name. The value of the fund would go up in line with the value of the property. The longer tenants stayed, the more they would benefit and in areas outside of the South East they could accumulate enough capital to put down a deposit on a private house.

HEALTH OF SCOTTISH HOUSING

C. Jones and P. Robson (eds)

Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2001

This book surveys the past and present state of Scotland's housing policies and legislation. It examines the extent, spatial pattern and courses of homelessness; The House of Lords and Homeless People's Rights; security of tenure and eviction policy; Housing and Local Government; housing associations; Scottish Homes; the private rented sector; owner occupation; new patterns, policies and the Scottish Parliament.

HOUSING POLICY, HOUSING MANAGEMENT AND TENANT POWER IN THE "RISK SOCIETY": SOME CRITICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE WELFARE POLITICS OF "RADICAL DOUBT"

C. Allen and N. Sprigings

Critical Social Policy, vol.21, 2001, p.384-412

Authors applied the work of Beck and other risk society theorists to make sense of the changing nature of housing policy and management issues in the post-welfare society.

HOW TO BEAT THE NEW SLUM LANDLORDS

F. Field

Guardian, Aug. 7th 2001, p.16

Calls for local authorities to be given powers to refuse housing benefit payments to irresponsible private landlords. They should also be given powers to pilot new homesteading arrangements, using public funds to enable poorer residents to acquire their own homes in deprived communities. Steps also need to be taken to control rogue housing associations which are not maintaining the properties they build.

THE PROPERTY TRAP

J. Sherman

Times, Aug. 3rd 2001, p.4-5

Public services such as health and education are in danger of collapse due to recruitment problems arising from lack of affordable housing for staff. The government's starter home initiative will give key workers an interest free loan of up to £25,000, but in many areas this will not be enough to enable them to buy a property. Moreover, the scheme will only cover an estimated 8,000 to 10,000 workers, a tiny proportion of those searching for properties.

REGISTERED SOCIAL LANDLORDS AND THE CARE STANDARDS ACT

P. Ridout

Registered Homes and Services, vol.6, 2001, p.38-40

The Act maintains the distinction between care and support. Nursing care as defined in the Act may not be purchased by the social services department. To access Housing Benefit, no personal care may be provided by the social landlord. It must be offered by a domiciliary care agency which must be registered and regulated under the Act. The landlord may, however, offer limited support services such as advice and warden services.