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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2001): Care of the Elderly - UK

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE: NATIONAL MINIMUM STANDARDS

Department of Health

Norwich: TSO, 2001

Standards set out in the document are core requirements which apply to all care homes providing accommodation and nursing or personal care for older people. They apply to homes for which registration as care homes is required, including currently registered residential care and nursing homes, new facilities, local authority care homes and establishments currently exempted under the Registered Homes Act 1984, for example Charter Homes. They cover choice of home, health and personal care, daily life and social activities, complaints, the physical environment, staffing and management.

CARE STANDARDS ACT: DRAFT REGULATIONS FOR CARE HOMES

P. Grose

Caring Times, Sept. 2001, p.12-13

The proposed new regulations for the conduct of care homes in England are very prescriptive and very specific. They attempt to give statutory force to issues which were formerly regarded as having the force of guidance only. If adopted as drafted they will lead to a large increase in paperwork and in the number of regulatory notices issued. The issue of a regulatory notice frequently leads to a suspension of local authority contracting.

CARE STANDARDS ACT 2000: (1) RAISING STANDARDS IN RESIDENTIAL AND NURSING HOME CARE

J. Dow

Managing Community Care, vol.9, Aug. 2001, p.7-12

Article looks at the regulation of residential and nursing home care. It compares the role of the National Care Standards Commission with the functions of local authority and health authority inspection units under the Registered Homes Act 1984.

COMMUNICATION AND THE CARE OF PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA

J. Killick and K. Allan

Buckingham: Open University Press, 2001

Explores in-depth ways of establishing and developing communication with people suffering from dementia. It looks at both the nature of dementia as a condition and the subjective experiences of these affected.

CONSULTATION, CONSULTATION, CONSULTATION

C. Vellenoweth

Registered Homes and Services, vol.6, 2001, p.52-53

Describes and discusses the inter-dependence of the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People and the various Regulations through which the National Care Standards Commission will regulate providers.

CURRENT AND FUTURE CHALLENGES IN COMMISSIONING CARE SERVICES FOR OLDER PEOPLE: CASE STUDY OF WEST SUSSEX

M. Griffiths

Managing Community Care, vol.9, Aug. 2001, p.13-19

The care market for older people is in crisis. Service providers are leaving the sector at an alarming rate and new providers are difficult to attract into the market. There is a national workforce shortage and greater regulation and it is becoming increasingly difficult to secure residential, nursing and domiciliary care at local authority agreed prices. Article explores the reasons for this growing volatility, through a case study of the West Sussex market.

ELDERLY SCOTS TO GET FREE CARE IN ENGLAND

A. MacLeod

Times, Sept. 10th 2001, p.4

Reports that under Scottish Executive plans to provide free personal care for the old, Scottish local authorities will be allowed to pay for elderly Scots who move to England. English people moving to Scotland will, however, not be eligible for free care.

(See also Daily Telegraph, Sept. 10th 2001, p.8).

web linkFAIR CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE

Care Development Group, Scottish Executive

Edinburgh: 2001

Proposes that personal care and nursing care in Scotland for those with an assessed need should be state funded up to a maximum of £90 per week and £65 per week respectively. Single shared assessment by health and social care must be finalised nationally by April 2002.

A FAIR DEAL FOR OLDER PEOPLE: PUBLIC VIEWS ON THE FUNDING OF LONG-TERM CARE: RESEARCH REPORT FROM THE KING'S FUND LONG-TERM CARE FINANCING PROJECT

C. Deeming

London: King's Fund, 2001

Presents results of an opinion poll which aimed to identify what the public thought about policies regarding the funding of long-term care. The government's decision to make nursing care free to people living in nursing homes was found to command popular support. However most people disagreed with the decision to continue means-tested charges for people who need help with personal care. More than three out of five people believed that personal care should be free, regardless of whether it is provided in hospital, in care homes or in people's own homes.

FREE NURSING CARE: NATIONALISATION BY STEALTH?

P. Ridout

Registered Homes and Services, vol.6, 2001, p.49-51

Describes how introduction of free nursing care for residents of private and voluntary sector homes will adversely impact on the financial situation of providers. Basically the new regulations mean that home owners will no longer be able to charge private patients or local authorities for nursing care. They will be reimbursed by the NHS at fixed rates which will not cover the real costs of the care provided.

FREE NURSING CARE FUNDING SHIFT DELAY

L. Revans

Community Care, no.1391, 2001, p.3

Full responsibility for funding free nursing care will not now be transferred to the NHS until 2003 in order to allow time for the NHS, social services and care homes time to establish effective working partnerships.

A HANDBOOK OF DEMENTIA CARE

C. Cantley (ed)

Buckingham: Open University Press, 2001

This book provides a wide-ranging, up-to-date overview of the current state of knowledge in the field of dementia care. It looks at how organisations, policy and research shape dementia care and introduces different approaches to practice and service development.

KILLING ME SOFTLY

B. Ferguson

Caring Times, Sept. 2001, p.36

Under the new minimum standards for care homes, only two adults will be able to live in an adult placement arrangement as part of the host family. All other homes will be required to meet the same minimum standards regardless of size. This will effectively kill them off.

LONG-TERM CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE: AN ANALYSIS OF PLACEMENTS IN GREENWICH

M. Hughes, P. Le Riche and D. Mayes

Managing Community Care, vol.9, Aug. 2001, p.20-25

Paper analyses 1375 long-term care placements approved by the London Borough of Greenwich through a multi-disciplinary panel. It suggests the need for increased attention to rehabilitation as an alternative to residential care and to the capacity of residential homes to deal with cognitive disorder. It concludes that attainment of the new national standards for care homes will require improvements in the process of admission, with fewer crisis placements.

MAN, 95, IN COURT FIGHT FOR CARE CASH

S. Pook

Daily Telegraph, Sept. 19th 2001, p.14

A Mr Christopher Beeson gave his house to his son four years ago. He subsequently entered a residential home and was told by the local authority that he would have to pay for his own care because "he had deprived himself of an asset with which he could have funded his residential care placement" by giving his house to his son. He is now appealing against this decision.

OF KNIGHTS, KNAVES AND MERCHANTS: THE CASE OF RESIDENTIAL CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE IN ENGLAND IN THE LATE 1990s

J. Kendall

Social Policy and Administration, vol.35, 2001, p.360-375

Paper examines the motivation of a sample of 50 providers of residential care for older people in England in 1997. A cluster analysis of their expressed motivations suggests three types: empathisers, professionals and income prioritisers. The analysis reveals a further motive common to all three types: the need to exercise control over, and experience ownership of, their enterprises. This motive should also be taken into account in policy design.

OLDER PEOPLE AND THE HEALTH-SOCIAL CARE BOUNDARY IN THE UK: HALF A CENTURY OF HIDDEN POLICY CONFLICT

J. Lewis

Social Policy and Administration, vol.35, 2001, p.343-359

Older people in the UK are more likely than those in the rest of Europe to experience the boundary between health and social care as a yawning gap between a cash-limited NHS and locally run means-tested social services. Paper uses newly available public records to show how the boundary between health and social care was set in stone in the early post war years and resulted in a constant battle between the two services over the needs they would meet. Concludes by examining the new NHS Plan and the extent to which it is likely to overcome the problems of the boundary.

QUALITY OF CARE IN PRIVATE SECTOR AND NHS FACILITIES FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA: CROSS SECTIONAL SURVEY

C. Ballard et al

British Medical Journal, vol.323, Aug. 25th 2001, p.426-427

Study used dementia care mapping to evaluate the quality of care in 10 private sector and 7 NHS care facilities for older people. Quality of care was rated as needing radical improvement or much improvement in all homes, and no home showed even a fair standard of care.

TOWARDS A NEW SOCIAL COMPACT FOR CARE IN OLD AGE

J. Robinson (ed)

London: King's Fund, 2001

A collection of six essays which explores controversial changes to the funding of long term care for older people. Papers explore past and future policy, reflecting the changing balance between the State's and the individual's responsibilities to cover risks associated with ill-health and disabilities.

TRANSFER OF A RESIDENTIAL CARE HOME: HUMAN RIGHTS ACT 1998

L. Murray

Housing, Care and Support, vol.4, Aug. 2001, p.30-32

Article discusses the legal basis of the judicial review of Birmingham Council's decision to transfer its residential care homes to an independently ran trust sought by Mrs Flossie Hands. Mrs Hands is currently resident in a care home owned and operated by the Council. She argues that plans to transfer the home could endanger her life.

WILL SOCIAL SERVICES SUFFER IN THE NEW REGIME?

M. Hunter

Community Care, no.1387, 2001, p.10-11

The Single Assessment Process (SAP) is designed to replace the current range of fragmented assessments of older people's needs carried out by different agencies with one seamless procedure. It is intended that health and social services should co-operate to produce a single centrally held electronic summary containing all the information needed to assess and provide for an older person's health and social care needs. This will result in the production of a comprehensive individual care plan. There is concern that the assessment will concentrate on medical rather than social care needs.

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