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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2001): Child Welfare - UK

ADOPTED ADULTS AND THEIR BIRTH SIBLINGS: DRAFT NATIONAL ADOPTION STANDARDS FOR ENGLAND AND PRACTICE GUIDANCE: ISSUED FOR CONSULTATION

Department of Health

London: Department of Health, 2001

Lays down that the welfare, safety, needs and wishes of adopted adults are to be the first consideration. Adopted adults and birth siblings are to be provided with information about local and national support groups and services. Agencies are to advise and help adopted adults and their birth siblings separated by adoption wishing to make contact with birth relatives. Adopted adults and birth siblings who request information from adoption agencies are to receive a response within three months and to be informed of their right to make representations and complaints.

CHILDREN'S HOMES: NATIONAL MINIMUM STANDARDS: CONSULTATION DOCUMENT

Department of Health

[London]: 2001

Standards cover planning for care, quality of care, complaints, discipline, physical environment, staffing and management. They will apply to private, voluntary and local council children's homes, and mainstream and special boarding schools.

THE CONTRIBUTION OF CHILDCARE TO LOCAL EMPLOYMENT: POOR WORK OR WORK FOR THE POOR?

G. Scott, J. Campbell and U. Brown

Local Economy, vol.16, 2001, p.187-197

Improved provision of childcare in deprived areas has had a positive impact on the labour market involvement of those who have been able to use it. It has also been argued that the development of locally based childcare services would create local employment opportunities. However the jobs created in childcare services have proved to be insecure, part-time and poorly paid.

DRAFT PRACTICE GUIDANCE TO SUPPORT THE NATIONAL ADOPTION STANDARDS FOR ENGLAND: ISSUED FOR CONSULTATION

Department of Health

London: 2001

Guidance covers protection of the interests of the children, efficient processing of applications from prospective adopters, support for adoptive and birth parents, corporate and senior management responsibilities of Councils, and Council Agency functions and Voluntary Adoption Agencies.

MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS? A STUDY OF A MULTI-AGENCY CHILDCARE NETWORK

V. Wigfall and P. Moss

London: National Children's Bureau, 2001

Qualitative study of the Campus, an innovative model of a multi-agency childcare network. It is distinctive as network of family and children's services created from a public-private partnership, and co-ordinated and headed by a voluntary organisation (Coram Family). The overall goal of the Campus is to create a "one-stop shop" for families and young children, with multi-agency services offering high quality, open access, mainstream provision.

THE PRICE PARENTS PAY: SHARING THE COSTS OF CHILDCARE

Daycare Trust

London: 2001

British parents face the highest childcare costs in Europe, with the typical cost of a full time nursery place for a two-year-old at £110 a week. As a result only 13% of parents can afford to use formal childcare services all the time. Even families on lower incomes who get help through the Childcare Tax Credit still have to find 30% of the cost themselves. Report calls on the government to deliver affordable childcare, increase public investment and simplify the funding system.

THE QUEEN'S SPEECH

Anon.

Child Right, no.178, 2001, p.3-4

Summarises the content of Bills announced in the Queen's Speech at the opening of Parliament after the general election of 2001 that will impact on children in the fields of education, adoption, and welfare benefits.

REGISTER PILOTS FLY NEW STANDARDS

S. Wellard

Community Care, no.1386, 2001, p.10-11

Two key elements of the government's drive to increase adoptions of children in care have been put into place with the launch of the new national adoption register and the publication of national adoption standards for England. While these are being tested in pilots, tension still exists between speeding up adoptions and the need to find and fund the right family.

SAVE THE CHILDREN

P. Healy

Community Practitioner, vol.74, 2001, p.333-334

The Director of the government's Children and Young People's Unit believes that community practitioners have a key role in new government initiatives aimed at improving the prospects of disadvantaged children. Their unique access to vulnerable young people and their families is vital.

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