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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2001): Education - UK - Training

ADULT COMMUNITY LEARNING

L. Britton

Working Brief, issue 127, 2001, p.10-12

Article looks at the evidence in two recent reports on the effectiveness of Adult Community Learning projects in bringing about basic skill improvements for non-traditional learners.

LEADERSHIP IN FURTHER EDUCATION FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM

M. Stokes

International Journal of Applied Management, vol.2, 2001, p.5-26

Study shows that leadership by principals in further education continues to be traditional and transactional. The leadership provided by a principal is based on his/her personal attributes and not on the leadership potential of people across the organisation. They are clearly concerned with structure and individuals, factors that pertain to management rather than leadership. The 21st century requires leadership that recognise the importance of working with everyone in the organisation and with each being given the opportunity to play a leadership role.

STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK TO 2004: CORPORATE PLAN

Learning and Skills Council

[London]: 2001

The Council aims to raise the proportion of 16-18-years-olds in education from 75% in 2000 to 80% in 2004. It wants 85% of young people to have level 2 qualifications by the age of 19, up 10% on present level. It has also set a target to increase the number of young people with level three qualifications (A-levels) by 4% to 55%. It also aims to raise the literacy and numeracy skills of 750, 000 adults by 2004 and increase the numbers educated to level 3 by 5% to 52% of the workforce.

TRAINING AND SUPPORT FOR LONE PARENTS: AN EVALUATION OF A TARGETED STUDY PROGRAMME

K. John, S. Payne and H. Land

York: York Publishing, 2001

Training remains a limited feature of the New Deal for Lone Parents, which is geared to those who are "work ready". The SPAN Study Centre (SSC) was set up as a pilot project designed to meet the needs of unemployed lone parents. The evaluation showed that most lone parents are ambitions and willing to work. Half wanted a good education. Childcare costs were the most frequently cited barrier to entry into education or training. The high quality of the Centre's courses and careers advice was valued, as was its crèche facilities.

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