Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2001): National Health Service - Community and Primary Care Services

ANALYSING STRUCTURAL INTERESTS IN PRIMARY CARE GROUPS

N. North and S. Peckham

Social Policy and Administration, vol.35, 2001, p.426-440

Paper identifies key players in English primary care groups as they relate to Alford's structural interest groups: the professional monopolisers, the corporate rationalisers and the community. It outlines the context of the involvement of the key groups and analyses the relationships between them. The analysis suggests that key tensions between groups of GPs who adopt a corporate rationaliser approach and those who retain a professional monopoliser role will be damaging to the progress and development of PCGs. It also highlights the continuing weakness of the community as an interest group despite the emphasis on involving patients and the public.

"BRIDGING THE GAP": NEW RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PRIMARY CARE GROUPS AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES

C. Glendinning, S. Abbott and A. Coleman

Social Policy and Administration, vol.35, 2001, p.411-425

Results of surveys of Primary Care Groups and Trusts in 1999 and 2000 show that the statutory requirement for PCG boards to include a social services representative is having a positive effect on inter-agency collaboration. However the predominance of social services representatives with responsibilities for adult services risks marginalising collaborative service developments for other groups such as children. Social services representatives' roles were also limited by their perceived lack of influence compared to GPs and by lack of coterminosity between PCG and local authority boundaries. Gains may also be jeopardised by further administrative upheavals as PCGs merge or move to Trust status.

GETTING IN ON THE ACT

J. Smith and E. Regen

Health Service Journal, vol.111, Sept. 6th 2001, p.28-29

A three-year in-depth study of 12 Primary Care Groups/Trusts shows that much remains to be done in terms of commissioning. PCG/Ts need also to be more active in tackling poor performance by GP practices or individual practitioners. Further delegation of responsibilities from health authorities to PCTs will be a challenge, given their reluctance to tackle service changes in secondary care. To ease the transition, more resources are needed for management support and organisational development.

MIX AND MATCH

C. Glendinning and K. Clarke

Community Care, no.1386, 2001, p.24-25

Presents a case study of the Well Family Service which offers advice and support services for families within primary care. Family support co-ordinators are placed in GP practices to offer help with a wide range of problems.

THE REPROFESSIONALISATION OF COMMUNITY PHARMACY? AN EXPLORATION OF ATTITUDES TO EXTENDED ROLES FOR COMMUNITY PHARMACISTS AMONG PHARMACISTS AND GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

J. Edmunds and M.W. Calnan

Social Science and Medicine, vol.53, 2001, p.943-955

Paper suggests that while community pharmacy is developing strategies to enhance its professional status, this is not so much an attempt at usurping the general practitioner's role as a bid for survival. However, GPs do not necessarily see the initiatives in the same light. Although many are accommodating some changes in community pharmacy, they also perceive some initiatives as a threat to their autonomy and control. Many pharmacists themselves attribute ultimate authority to doctors, thus undermining moves to gain professional status for community pharmacists. They are also held back by internal occupational divisions between retail pharmacists and employee pharmacists.

A "THIRD WAY" FOR LAY INVOLVEMENT: WHAT EVIDENCE SO FAR?

S. Pickard and K. Smith

Health Expectations, vol.4, 2001, p.170-179

Report on survey data submitted by the lay members of Primary Care Group (PCG) boards. Results suggest that during the first six months of operation of PCGs, the lay board members' roles were unclear and hence varied, but they seemed to have little influence on decision making. The situation may change as the Groups become better established and lay members become more familiar with their activities. However the survey suggests that the structures that are intended to enhance the voice of patients and the public in the NHS may not automatically deliver the intended results.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web