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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2001): Social Care - UK

CROSS-BORDER RAIDERS

L. Revans and J. Pearce

Community Care, No. 1386, 2001, p.12

Report of interviews with the Chief Inspector of Social Services and the Chief Nursing Officer who will be jointly responsible for the development of care trusts. These bodies were brought in under the Health and Social Care Act 2001 to commission and provide delegated health and social care functions.

DOMESTIC MATTERS

E. Williamson

Community Care, No. 1391, 2001, p.22-23

The treatment of women injured by domestic violence would be much improved by better joint working between health care practitioners and social care professionals. This approach would reduce the workload of both medics and social workers.

FROM JOINT COMMISSIONING TO PARTNERSHIP WORKING: WILL THE NEW POLICY FRAMEWORK MAKE A DIFFERENCE?

R. Greig and R. Poxton

Managing Community Care, Vol.9, Aug 2001, p.32-38

Partnership working is now a major guiding force in the development of health and social care, and its practical outworkings are embodied in Joint Investment Plans and Health Improvement Programmes, etc. Article explores whether the new policy framework can overcome the obstacles that prevented earlier experiments with joint commissioning having a greater impact.

GOING THROUGH THE MOTIONS

F. Rickford

Community Care, No.1391, 2001, p.18-19

Discusses the impact of an increasingly formal and prescribed assessment process on social work in both adult and children's services.

HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMMES AND JOINT INVESTMENT PLANS: MAKING CONNECTIONS

A. Holmes-Smith

Housing, Care and Support, Vol.4, Aug 2001, p.12-15

Health Improvement Programmes (HImPs) and Joint Investment Plans (JIPs) are key mechanisms in helping health and social care agencies to work together. Article describes the processes involved in drawing up these plans.

THE IMPACT OF NEW LABOUR HEALTH POLICY ON SOCIAL SERVICES: A NEW DEAL FOR SERVICES USERS' HEALTH?

P. Bywaters and E. McLeod

British Journal of Social Work, Vol.31, 2001, p.579-594

The Health policies of the Labour Government 1997-2001 included an increased emphasis on social services departments' (SSDs) contribution to promoting health. Three dimensions of this policy shift are discussed:

1) the drive towards organisational fusion of elements of the NHS and SSDs;

2) the new mechanisms for conjoint funding of health and social services: and

3) the new policy focus on tackling health inequalities by combating social inequalities on a national and local basis

THE IMPACT OF THE FIRST TERM OF THE NEW LABOUR GOVERNMENT ON SOCIAL WORK IN BRITAIN: THE INTERFACE BETWEEN EDUCATION POLICY AND SOCIAL WORK

E. Blyth

British Journal of Social Work, Vol.31, 2001, p.563-577

This paper considers how far the New Labour education policy represents a clear shift in focus from the policies of the Conservative administrations of the 1980s and 1990s. Concludes that current government policy owes as much to New Right ideology as it does to that of the Old Left. In the light of the new emphasis on social inclusion paper considers the implications of current developments in education policy for child and family social work in general, and education social work in particular.

A POISIONED CHALICE

M. Gould

Health Service Journal, Vol.111, Aug 30th 2001, p.9-10

Discusses the state of social work as a profession on the eve of the integration of social care with the NHS. Social services departments struggle with chronic staff shortages and have come in for fierce media criticism for failing vulnerable people in their care.

REGULATION OR FRAGMENTATION? DIRECTIONS FOR SOCIAL WORK UNDER NEW LABOUR

J. Orme

British Journal of Social Work, Vol.31, 2001, p.611-624

Article reviews the modernising agenda of New Labour for social work and social care announced in the "Quality Strategy for Social Care" white paper. Focusing largely on arrangements for education and training, the article argues that, rather than presenting a coherent strategy, the structures and procedures are fragmented and uncoordinated at many levels.

TOUGH LOVE: SOCIAL WORK, SOCIAL EXCLUSION AND THE THIRD WAY

Bill Jordan

British Journal of Social Work, Vol.31, 2001, p.527-546

Article explores the paradox that social work in the UK seems to be faring worse under a Labour Government than it did during 18 years of Conservative administrations. The Blair government has tackled the legacy of the Thatcher - Major years (social inequality, division and conflict) by redefining social justice in terms of "opportunity" and "community". On the face of it, the new definition might seem to favour social work as an instrument of social policy because its implementation requires more personal contact between officials and citizens, and a more important role for civil society organisations. However, the government's programme also treats the public sector, including social services, as part of the problem to be addressed, rather than part of the solution, and public sector social work has been relegated to a limited role in assessing and managing risks.

VOICES FROM THE FRONT LINE: STATE SOCIAL WORKERS AND NEW LABOUR

C. Jones

British Journal of Social Work, Vol.31, 2001, p.547-562

From the perspective of front-line state social workers, the election of a Labour Government in 1997 proved a massive disappointment. Many reported that it has further undermined state social work practice, workers and clients. The paper seeks to offer an explanation by noting the neo-liberalism of Labour's social policy and the dire consequences which flow from New Labour's fixation with paid work as the principle solution to social exclusion and poverty.

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