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Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2001): Child Welfare - UK

AN ABC OF MENTORS' TALK ABOUT DISAFFECTED YOUTH: ALTERNATIVE LIFESTYLES, BENEFIT DEPENDENCY OR COMPLETE DUNCES?

H. Colley

Youth and Policy, no. 72, 2001, p. 1-15

Paper draws on evidence from an empirical research project to examine some assumptions about the process of mentoring disaffected youth. It focuses on mentors' empathy with young people's social and personal situations. Findings suggest that the mentors involved in the project operated primarily with deficit or deviancy models of their mentees needs, conceptualising them as dangerously other than themselves. Implications for practice are considered as mentoring expands through new policy driven initiatives.

ADOPTING SOUND POLICY

F. Rickford

Community Care, Sept. 27th-Oct. 3rd 2001, p. 36-37

Describes the work of the Adoption and Permanence Task Force. This body aims to help local authorities to improve their performance and to promote good practice. It functions as a highly qualified team of specialist management consultants and shows how local authorities and the voluntary sector can share their own considerable expertise and experience.

ADOPTION REGISTER AND NATIONAL STANDARDS

Anon.

ChildRight, no. 179, 2001, p. 3-4

The new national standards for the adoption service have been established to assist people who come into contact with the system in understanding how it operates and what they can expect from it. The Adoption Register will seek to make the matching of children with adoptive parents easier.

THE CONTRIBUTION OF CHILDCARE TO LOCAL EMPLOYMENT: POOR WORK OR WORK FOR THE POOR?

G. Scott, J. Campbell and U. Brown

Local Economy, vol. 16, 2001, p. 187-197

Investment in childcare projects links together social and economic regeneration. It offers employment within the local area, gives local people with children the opportunity of accessing the wider labour market and increases the level of childcare provision in areas of deprivation, with possible long term benefits for the children's educational achievement. The increase in childcare availability has had a positive impact on the employment prospects of those able to use it. However, childcare employment has proved to be insecure, part-time and badly paid.

THE FIRST SECOND

D. Nicholls

Young People Now, no. 150, 2001 p. 26-27

Discusses the impact of the newly created professions of learning mentor and personal adviser on youth work.

KEEPING TRACK OF VULNERABLE YOUNG PEOPLE: A POLICY AGENDA

A. Canny, A. E. Green and M. Maguire

Youth and Policy, no. 72, 2001, p. 16-34

Paper reports the main findings of a study which examined the increased emphasis in policy and practice on keeping track of vulnerable young people, and the corresponding importance placed upon partnership working. It explores the extent to which tracking mechanisms are in place across England, the rationale behind tracking, and some of the advantages and limitations of current tracking methodologies. It identifies the difficulties experienced by agencies in building reliable, accurate, up-to-date and robust tracking systems.

KINSHIP CARE: THE PLACEMENT CHOICE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

B. Broad (ed)

Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing, 2001

Looking at many different aspects of kinship care, this book covers legal research and theoretical perspectives, experiences and lessons from policies in practice and research findings. It provides evidence about kinship care outcomes, training materials and the system from a carer's perspective. It examines the caring roles and concerns of grandparents and the black extended family. Issues of foster care, family support and inter-generational care are all raised.

MERGER MANIA?

P. Conner

Young People Now, no. 150, 2001, p. 18-19

Connexions services are being developed in some areas through the formation of private companies to which local authority youth workers and careers guidance staff are being transferred. Article discusses the effect of this approach on service to young people, and the threat to jobs and loss of democratic accountability it entails.

A PROFILE OF CHILDMINDING: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANNING

A. Mooney et al

Children and Society, vol. 15, 2001, p. 253-262

Paper reports the results from a postal survey of a nationally representative sample of over 1000 childminders. Results are reported concerning childminders' training and employment histories, working conditions, commitment and job satisfaction. Two groups of childminders emerge: a group where childminding may be a passing phase and a group who consider it as a long-term career. Findings are discussed with reference to the aims of the National Childcare Strategy and the role of the Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership.

SECOND TIME AROUND: A SURVEY OF GRANDPARENTS RAISING THEIR GRANDCHILDREN

A. Richards

London: Family Rights Group, 2001

Research reveals that a least 1% of British grandparents make huge sacrifices to prevent their grandchildren going into care after family breakdown. Many are forced to retire early or cut their working hours so that they can look after the children, but they are frequently denied benefits, often encounter huge costs trying to obtain court orders to protect the children, and rarely receive adequate help from social services. Calls for reforms to reduce the pressure on grandparents, including the creation of a special benefit or tax credit.

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