Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2001): Education - Overseas

BUILDING INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS: TOOLS AND STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS

A. Halvorsen and T. Neary

Allyn and Bacon, 2001

This book looks at what is meant by the term inclusion. It examines the integration of the general education system and special education in the US to meet the requirements of IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). It explores effective instruction for all students and planning for individual students' needs in the inclusive classroom. It gives examples of peer relationships and support. It covers everything from the legal rationale for building inclusive schools to effective classroom techniques.

ECONOMIC RATIONALISM AND EDUCATION REFORMS IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

Y. L. J. Lam

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 39, 2001, p.346-358

The current wave of educational reforms in developed countries is being driven by "economic rationalism". Article develops a model linking rationalistic principles such as efficiency, productivity and accountability with various formats of educational reforms. Specific objects of the reforms include cost reduction, higher rate of social return, more reliable and comparable outcome assessment and greater public control. Public educators should realign themselves to this paradigm shift if they are to retain their professional leadership in a more turbulent environment.

HIGHER EDUCATION AND ATTAINMENT OF POLICY GOALS: INTERPRETATIONS FOR EFFICIENCY INDICATORS IN ISRAEL

I. Geva - May

Higher Education, vol. 42, 2001, p.265-305

Study concern the identification of policy aims and goals in Israeli higher education and an analysis of efficiency indicators to determine the extent and nature of HE policy goal attainment at the Israeli Universities.

MODELS OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICES AND CRITICAL CONSIDERATIONS

J. Martin, J. Sugarman and J. McNamara

Calgary, Alberta: Detselig Enterprises Ltd, 2001

Examines theoretical principles and classroom practices associated with a variety of approaches to classroom management. It looks at interpersonal communication; principles of democratic interaction; group management; behaviour modification; social theory and cognitive psychology; effective schooling and contemporary socio-cultural theory. It also discusses legal and ethical issues and the professional development and lives of teachers.

NATIONAL TRAINING PACKAGES: A NEW CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN AUSTRALIA

L. Wheelahan and R. Carter

Education and Training, vol. 43, 2001, p. 303-316

National training packages have become the mandated framework for course delivery in Australia's vocational education and training sector. Each training package contains qualifications that can be issued and industry-derived competencies and assessment guidelines, but do not contain an endorsed curriculum component or learning outcomes. All public and private vocational education providers must use training packages, or industry endorsed competencies in cases where the former do not exist, if they are to receive public funding for their programmes.

THE PURSUIT OF STANDARDS: SIMPLY MANAGING EDUCATION?

D. Meadmore

International Journal of Inclusive Education, vol.5, 2001, p.353-365

Paper investigates the recent move by the federal government in Australia to manage more closely the primary sector of education through the use of national performance standards. Questions the suitability of such tests for children who are different from the monocultural able bodied mainstream. Argues that inclusive practices in primary education are being jeopardised by creeping standardisation practices.

QUALITY OF UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN NIGERIA: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

C. C. Utulu

International Studies in Educational Administration, vol. 29, 2001, p.58-66

Universities in Nigeria are under-funded in the face of rising demand, are faced with a shortage of appropriately qualified staff, and suffer from inadequate research facilities. Proposes the adoption of a strategy of cost recovery involving the introduction of tuition fees and a student loan programme in order to raise funds to invest in higher education.

SCHOOL VOUCHER SCHEME GOES TO SUPREME COURT

P. Waldmeir

Financial Times, Sept. 26th 2001, p.13

The US Supreme Court is to decide whether school voucher programmes, which give parents federal money to spend on private education, violate the constitution. Such programmes in practice overwhelmingly benefit religious schools and may violate the constitutionally mandated separation of church and state.

UNDERSTANDING THE IRISH VET SYSTEM: BEYOND NEOCLASSICISM

D. O'Donnell, T. N. Garavan and of McCarthy

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 22, 2001, p.425-444

Evaluations of national or regional Vocational Education and Training systems continue to be dominated by neo-classical economic theory. Paper argues for the potential benefit of including alternative interdisciplinary approaches in any evaluation of the Irish VET system as it relates to its economic system and institutional heritage. Following the "societal effect" approach, argues that VET systems can only be understood with reference to the dynamic set of interrelationships between the education and training systems, the industrial relations system, the organisational structure of industry and the class and status relations of the wider society as reflected in its political system.

WHAT RESEARCH CAN TELL POLICYMAKERS ABOUT SCHOOL CHOICE

P. Teske and M. Schneider

Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, vol.20, 2001, p.609-631

Authors assessed the accumulating evidence about the effects of school choice on a variety of educational outcomes. The analysis shows that most parents who choose will be more satisfied with their choice, or at least with the opportunity to make one. Many parents who make choices become more involved in their children's education. Some evidence indicates that the children in schools they have chosen will perform better, although this is mixed. There is also some evidence that higher SES parents are more likely to exercise choice when given the opportunity and may choose to avoid schools with large numbers of lower SES or minority ethnic children.

WHY CAN'T OUR TEACHERS BE AS GOOD AS THOSE IN SWITZERLAND?

C. Woodhead

Daily Telegraph, Oct. 17th 2001, p.24

Proposes Switzerland, Germany and Arizona as models for UK education reform. Switzerland's successful education system uses whole class teaching and a tightly defined curriculum, and prescribes rigidly how teachers should approach any given topic. Germany has a very successful vocational education system based on on-the-job training. Arizona has pioneered charter schools which are publicly funded, privately operated state schools.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web