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Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2001): National Health Service - Community and Primary Care Services

CUT TO THE QUICK

L. Hill and I. Rutter

Health Service Journal, vol. 111, Oct. 4th 2001, p. 24-25

Describes a primary care trust's bid to collaborate with other PCTs and its local hospitals to speed up the service to patients within both the primary and secondary care setting. The strategy involves avoiding unnecessary referrals, preventing bed blocking, and improved management information, enabling activity and financial targets to be set for GP practices.

NEGOTIATING AND MANAGING PARTNERSHIP IN PRIMARY CARE

J. Charlesworth

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 9, 2001, p. 279-285

In health care delivery in the UK local government, health authorities and trusts, voluntary and community groups are extending existing and developing new forms of partnership, particularly around Health Improvement Programmes and new primary care organisations. Paper explores two main aspects of how these new interorganisational relationships are being developed and managed, based on a case study. Examines the tensions involved in working within new policy-making and management structures, and how the additional demands of audit, performance measurement, and rapid change pose a potential threat to the partnership process.

PRIMARY CARE IN THE UK: UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMICS OF DEVOLUTION

M. Exworthy

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 9, 2001, p. 266-278

Paper describes recent health policy reform with regard to primary care in terms of the tension inherent in current policy between the notion of a "one nation NHS" and the territorial diversity wrought by devolution.

RESIGNED TO THE JOB

S. Ainsworth

Health Service Journal, vol. 111, Sept. 27th 2001, p. 24-27

More than half of the GPs in the UK have said they will consider resigning from the NHS if the government will not agree to improvements in their contracts. GPs have been threatening to resign from public health-care for the past 90 years. In March 1948, 90% of doctors voted against the proposed NHS. By September 1948, 90% of GPs had signed up with the NHS. GPs' threats to resign need to be seen in the context of history.

STRESS MAKES 25% OF GPS WANT TO QUITE NHS

J. Carvel

Guardian, Oct. 18th 2001, p. 13

A survey by the British Medical Association has shown that 25% of Britain's 42,000 general practitioners want to leave within five years because of stress and workload, with 48% planning to retire early. A fifth said that the stresses of work led to excessive demands, and nearly two-thirds said their morale was worse than five years ago.

(See also Independent, Oct. 18th 2001, p. 14; Times, Oct. 18th 2001, p. 18; Daily Telegraph, Oct. 18th 2001, p. 14)

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