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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2002): Care of the Elderly - UK

BUILDING CAPACITY AND PARTNERSHIP IN CARE

Department of Health

London: 2001

Focuses on local councils and the independent sector making long-term agreements on services for older people, intended to stabilise the care home industry. The involvement of users and carers is said to be the starting point for improving services. Housing needs related to health and social care, including specialised provision, are seen as "vital" to the overall assessment on which commissioning is based. Information strategies will be needed to achieve an understanding of supply and demand in the local market, prices charged, the cost of provision and the quality of services. On the basis of all this information commissioners are required to produce strategic plans on the type and quantity of services to be purchased, allowing providers to develop appropriate business plans.

CARE DIRECT: WHAT IS IS AND HOW IS IT BEING DEVELOPED

P Searle

Managing Community Care, vol 9, Oct 2001, p 37-41

The government announced plans in 2000 for the development of the Care Direct service for older people, a one-stop-shop gateway to information and help. Article describes how plans are progressing to pilot the new initiative in Devon, which is one of six pilot sites.

FREE NURSING CARE IN NURSING HOMES

N Grant and S Thompson

Registered Homes and Services, vol 6, 2001, p 83-85

Summarises the content of the final Guidance and Direction on free nursing care for self-funders in nursing homes. Covers the extent of NHS responsibility for free nursing care, bandings, responsibility for assessment, and contracting arrangements.

HIGH PRICE OF FREE BEDS

J Hirst

Public Finance, Oct 19th-25th 2001, p 19-21

The government has announced a £300m cash injection over two years to enable local authorities to purchase more residential and intermediate care for older people, thus heading of an NHS bed-blocking crisis.

(See also Community Care, Oct 18th-24th 2001, p 20; Caring Times, Nov 2001, p 1-2)

NATIONAL MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE: THE RELATIVES AND RESIDENTS' PERSPECTIVE

J Burton-Jones

Registered Homes and Services, vol 6, 2001, p 85-87

Considers the potential of the new Minimum Standards for promoting and facilitating consultation with relatives and residents.

THE NEW NCSC: WHAT ROLE FOR RELATIVES AND RESIDENTS?

T Burgner

Caring Times, Oct 2001, p 8 & 12

Briefly describes the role and functions of the National Care Standards Commission in respect of the regulation of residential care homes for older people.

RNHA ATTACKS GOVERNMENT'S "FREE" NURSING CARE SCHEME

Anon

Caring Times, Nov 2001, p 4

The Registered Nursing Homes Association has attacked the government's scheme for free nursing care for self-funding residents as being bureaucratic and penny-pinching.

TRANSFERRING REGISTRATION

P Grose

Caring Times, Oct 2001, p 16-17

Explains in detail the provisions of the draft order regulating the transfer of registration of existing care homes to the National Care Standards Commission.

THE TRUTH ABOUT "FREE" CARE

M Henwood

Community Care, Nov 1st-7th 2001, p 36-37

Presents an overview of the government's plans for the reform of long term care for the elderly. These include improved preventive and rehabilitation services, a single needs assessment process for health and social care, and free nursing care for people in residential homes. Free nursing care will benefit about 42,000 people in residential homes who are currently paying for their own care; they will see their fees reduced.

VITAL STATISTICS

K Miller and P Ball

Community Care, Oct 25th-31st 2001, p 38-39

Describes changes in the market for residential and nursing home care for the elderly in the North West over the past seven years. There has been a decline in overall capacity and homes have closed. Nursing homes have been most at risk of ceasing to be viable, while independent residential care providers have been more secure.

WHO CARES, SINS

B Ferguson

Caring Times, Oct 2001, p 36

The proposed new regulations governing care homes would impose draconian penalties for minor infractions and give the National Care Standards Commiission access to sensitive information about a home's financial situation.

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