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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2002): Education - Overseas

DESIGNING APPROPRIATE CURRICULUM FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS IN URBAN SCHOOLS

T. E. Morse

Education and Urban Society, vol. 34, 2001, p.4-17

The US Individuals with Disabilities Education Act states that students with disabilities are to be provided with specially designed instruction. Article discusses the design of an appropriate curriculum for special education students in urban schools. First, the unique circumstances of urban special education students are discussed. A comprehensive curriculum model that can be used to design an appropriate curriculum for these students is presented.

ENTERPRISING CITIZENS? PERCEPTIONS OF CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION AND ENTERPRISE EDUCATION IN ENGLAND AND HUNGARY

I. Davies et al

Educational Review, vol. 53, 2001, p. 261-269

Describes the early stages of a project to explore the perceptions of teachers concerning the tensions and overlaps between drives to promote a form of education that stresses competitiveness and enterprise at the same time as emphasising the centrality of civic values.

GUIDING SCHOOL CHANGE: THE ROLE AND WORK OF CHANGE AGENTS

F. O'Connell Rust and H. Freidus (eds.)

New York: Teachers College Press, 2001

This book looks at school reform and the role and work of change agents. It covers issues such as the implementation of curriculum change, partners in school innovation, and pre-service supervision. Highlights the roles of change agents as negotiators, nurturers, teachers, learners and curriculum developers.

THE IMPACT OF EMERGING MARKET BASED PUBLIC POLICY ON URBAN SCHOOLS AND A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY

C. S. Ridenour, T.J. Lasley and W.L. Bainbridge

Education and Urban Society, vol. 34, 2001, p.66-83

Argues that state education is intended to serve the public good. Then discusses the underlying shift in the US from public policy based on democratic principles to public policy based on market assumptions and exemplified by charter schools and school choice. Provides evidence to substantiate the claim that the most disadvantaged students will be left behind if a market-based policy shift takes place without appropriate public policy safeguards.

KINGDOM OF CHILDREN : CULTURE AND CONTROVERSY IN THE HOMESCHOOLING MOVEMENT

M. L. Stevens

Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2001

This book examines and explains why parents decide to home school their children. It dispels many criticisms that have emerged around the homeschooling movement and reveals an elaborate social movement with its own celebrities, networks, and characteristic lifeways.

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: ISSUES, POLICIES AND PRACTICES

F. Salili and R. Hoosain

Greenwich, Conn. Information Age Publishing: 2001 (Research in Multicultural Education and International Perspectives; vol. 1)

This book presents a collection of recent research findings on different aspects of multicultural education. It provides a brief history alongside other issues, policies and new approaches in multicultural education around the world.

THE NEW EAST EUROPEAN MODEL OF EDUCATION, TRAINING AND YOUTH

EMPLOYMENT

K. Roberts

Journal of Education and Work, vol. 14, 2001, p.315-328

Paper outlines, in ideal typical terms, a new model of education, training and youth employment which has become visible to varying extents in the ex-Communist countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. The new model defines academic, non-vocational education as "general" in both official and everyday discourse. General education is deemed capable of being delivered in ways and at speeds which are suited to all ability levels. State funding is basic, leading to the development of private education at pre-school, elementary, secondary and tertiary levels, and to a substantial role for private finance in the state sector. This makes low levels of taxation compatible with high levels of enrolment and attainment in upper secondary and tertiary education. Finally the size and shape of vocational education at upper secondary and tertiary levels determines the size and shape of the other parts of the system. This is the exact reverse of what happens in Western Europe.

THE NEW GOVERNANCE OF FRENCH EDUCATION?

A. Cole

Public Administration, vol. 79, 2001, p.707-724

Defines governance as signifying changing patterns of public management, the emergence of new types of networked and interdependent relationships, the blurring of boundaries between the public, private and voluntary sectors and a more reflective policy style. Article explores the governance paradigm in the domain of French education. Investigates changing patterns of policy-making in French education at macro, meso and micro levels. Argues for the existence of a French-style governance that operates within distinctive ideational and institutional environments and interest structures. Emphasizes the importance of historical and institutional traditions in framing the available pathways of governance.

THE NEWS OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: A NARRATIVE ANALYSIS

B. Dorries and B. Haller

Disability and Society, vol. 16, 2001, p.871-891

Article analyses newspaper coverage of a court battle between the Loudoun County, Va., Board of Education and the parents of one Mark Hartmann, an autistic child. The parents took the Board of Education to court in an attempt, which they lost, to get the 11-year-old reinstated in a mainstream school. The case forms part of the national debate in the US over the best method of educating children with severe disabilities.

RACIAL POLITICS AND THE ELUSIVE QUEST FOR EXCELLENCE AND EQUITY IN EDUCATION

P.A. Noguera

Education and Society, vol. 34, 2001, p.18-41

Article examines the factors that influence the development of educational policies designed to ameliorate the achievement gap in relatively affluent US school districts in order to shed light on the complexities surrounding the relationship between race and academic performance. Begins by describing initiatives taken by schools in the Minority Student Achievement Network. Then draws on research evidence collected from a study conducted at Berkeley High School (BHS) to show how racial disparities in academic outcomes are influenced by the structure of opportunity within schools and how efforts to address inequities often become politicised. Uses the case of BHS to show how political factors complicate efforts to reduce racial disparities in student achievement.

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