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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2002): Mental Health Services - UK

A GROWING NEED

N Valios

Community Care, Nov 1st-7th 2001, p 32-33

There is an increasing need for services for people with Down's Syndrome who develop dementia in later life. Provision required includes more appropriate day services, care packages in family homes or social housing, transport that takes into account clients' mobility problems, more money for aids and adaptations, and more specialist services.

LEARNING TO PARTNER, DISCILLING CONFLICT: EARLY INDICATIONS OF AN IMPROVING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARENTS AND PROFESSIONALS WITH REGARD TO SERVICE PROVISION FOR CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES.

S Case

Disability and Society, vol 16, 2001, p 837-854

Data collected via a postal questionnaire suggest that professionals are beginning to address the need for clear and appropriate information and intervention, and to acknowledge parental needs and expertise and the effectiveness of parental involvement, while parents function within the role of service consumers. Consequently, previous levels of dissatisfaction with learning disability professionals in the UK are slowly being undermined, although services remain reactive, particularly in terms of counselling and advice, despite the need and desire for more proactive provision.

MANAGING RISK IN LEARNING DISABILITIES SERVICES

J Manthorpe

Managing Community Care, vol 9, Oct 2001, p 42-47

Report of conference which explored the management of risk in the context of the new policy agenda of social inclusion, choices and empowerment for people with learning disabilities.

MIND GAMES

M Gould

Health Service Journal, vol 111, Oct 25th 2001, p 14.

In spite of a £330m injection of funding, there is still tremendous pressure on acute mental health beds, and appropriate community services, which could offer alternatives to hospital admission, are not in place.

MISPLACED AND FORGOTTEN: PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES IN RESIDENTIAL CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE

D Thompson and S Wright

Mental Health Foundation, 2001

Report finds that an alarming number of younger people with learning disabilities are being inappropriately placed in old people's homes. People were placed in homes following the ageing or death of relatives who had been caring for them, or because of the closure of long stay hospitals. Once placed in a residential home, people with learning difficulties are liable to become isolated and be overlooked by social services.

ON THE LOOK-OUT

J Jaycock and T Bamber

Health Service Journal, vol 111, Nov 8th 2001, p 26-27

A survey of medium-secure units in England and Wales for people with mental health problems found a total of 1934 beds. Two-thirds were provided by the NHS and one-third by the private sector. Most units cost £2,000 - £2,500 per week per patient. The private units were among the most expensive. Average occupancy was over 90%, but the units were planning expansions that would provide an extra 1,135 beds over the next four years.

SATURDAY NIGHTS ALL RIGHT

C Hayes

Health Service Journal, vol 111, Nov 8th 2001, p 25

Describes the work of a weekend crisis intervention team for people with mental health problems in north-east Essex. Staff can provide telephone advice, make home visits, bring a client into day hospital, carry out assessments and admit to acute wards where necessary.

STANDARD SEVEN: SUICIDE PREVENTION

D Duffy and T Ryan

Mental Health Today, Sept 2001, p 28-30

Describes a national network established to support work aimed at facilitating the implementation of the Mental Health National Service framework standard seven on suicide prevention.

TOWARDS A SHARED LEARNING

T Basset

Mental Health Today, Sept 2001, p 20-22

Mental health education and training are in a state of flux. Boundaries between the traditional professions of psychology, psychiatry, nursing, occupational therapy and social work are breaking down, and there is a gradual move towards more inter-professional, joint and shared learning. Service users and carers are slowly gaining a greater influence on and involvement in mental health training and education.

YOUR FRIEND OR MINE?

C Jackson

Mental Health Today, Sept 2001, p 8-9

Mental health service user groups have expressed serious concerns about the independence of the NHS Patient Advocacy and liaison schemes which are intended to replace Community Health Councils. They will be funded and operated by the trust in which they are based, but are supposed to advocate on behalf of patients.

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