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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2002): Social Security - UK - New Deal

BRITAIN: MOVING TOWARDS A WORK AND OPPORTUNITY-FOCUSED WELFARE STATE?

M. E. Evans

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 10, 2001, p. 260-266

Focusing on Britain's welfare-to-work programmes this article explores what has been done so far and examines what the overall impact has been. It looks at how the 'New Deals' have actively been delivering and making work pay and how they fair as development social policy.

DISABLED PEOPLE BEING "BULLIED" BY BENEFITS REGIME

B. Russell

Independent, Oct. 23rd 2001, p. 10

It has come to light that draft guidelines for job centre staff require that three yearly "work-focused" interviews for disabled people should only be waived in the last resort. The government has been accused of bullying claimants of Incapacity Benefit who are severely disabled and cannot work by insisting that they attend these interviews.

GETTING PEOPLE ATTACHED TO WORK

M. Nathan

Working Brief, no. 128, 2001, p. 10-14

The New Deals have been successful in getting people into work, but policies should also be developed to help people stay in jobs and progress up the career ladder. Measures could include continued support from a personal adviser and access to training and careers guidance.

LABOUR'S NEW DEAL CONFRONTS ITS DARKEST DAYS

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Oct. 22nd 2001, p. 21

Points out that Employment Zones have been more successful that the various New Deals in getting their clients back into work. The Zones are run as public-private partnerships and offer a more flexible and personalised approach. Argues that both schemes may need to provide more in-work support to help clients sustain jobs. Finding jobs for clients will become appreciably more difficult as unemployment rises.

WHAT'S A JOB WORTH

Anon.

Mental Health Today, Nov. 2001, p. 10-11

Describes the newly launched New Deal for Disabled People. This is a brokerage scheme under which contractors are paid by results for the numbers of disabled people for whom they find work, and who are still in work six months later. There is concern that the contractors will focus exclusively on the most able and on the lack of provision for in-work support.

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