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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2002): Social Security - Overseas

ARE SINGLE MOTHERS FINDING JOBS WITHOUT DISPLACING OTHER WORKERS?

R. I. Lerman and C. Ratcliffe

Monthly Labor Review, vol. 124, July 2001, p. 3-12

Despite a large influx of single mothers into the labour force in the US following the implementation of welfare reform in 1996, metropolitan areas have generated enough jobs to employ these new entrants without deleterious effects on competing groups of workers.

CHILE: HAS SOCIAL SECURITY PRIVATISATION FOSTERED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT?

S. Borzutzky

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 10, 2001, p. 294-299

A critical analysis of the privatisation of social security in Chile and the impact it has had on the economy and society.

CHINA: DEVELOPMENTALISM AND SOCIAL SECURITY

K. Tang and R. Ngan

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 10, 2001, p. 253-259

Looking at China's developmental approach to social welfare, this article discusses initiatives such as the replacement of the employer-based insurance model. It assesses China's new social security system and examines the advantages of a largely social insurance model and the major role played by the state.

FALLING THROUGH THE SAFETY NET: POOR WOMEN AND WELFARE REFORM IN AN AMERICAN CITY

J. Verber

Social Polities, vol. 8, 2001, p. 197-202

Describes the impact of welfare reform on poor women in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A survey of former welfare recipients showed that 72% were not working. Those who had obtained paid work were struggling in minimum wage, part-time or temporary jobs. Those who had not obtained work survived by borrowing money, receiving money from friends and relatives, obtaining food from food pantries and doing odd jobs like baby sitting.

A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON SOCIAL SECURITY PROGRAMS FOR THE UNEMPLOYED

J. Dixon

International Social Work, vol. 44, 2001, p. 405-422

Article explores the global patterns of social security provision for the unemployed and its method of financing. Also ranks unemployment programmes in 80 countries. Finds that the provision of unemployment benefits has been addressed in most countries through a social insurance scheme. Few instances of distinctive practices can be identified. Mandatory personal savings programmes have been adopted only in Colombia and Guatemala. National Provident funds are used only in Nepal and Zambia. Social assistance is used only to provide a safety net for those not covered by the employment-based insurance scheme.

IN DEFENSE OF WOMEN'S ECONOMIC SECURITY: SECURING ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION UNDER WELFARE REFORM

L. S. Deprez and S. S. Butler

Social Polities, vol. 8, 2001, p. 210-227

In the US state of Maine, a coalition of welfare recipients and middle class advocates succeeded in persuading the state legislature to approve a programme supporting secondary education for low-income women.

RHETORIC AND REALITY OF WORK-BASED WELFARE REFORM

M. Cancian

Social Work, vol. 46, 2001, p. 309-214

The pro-work rhetoric surrounding current efforts in the US to move women off of benefits and into jobs rests on at least three propositions: work is the norm, work is good for families, and work leads to self-sufficiency. Article reviews empirical evidence on each of these propositions and concludes that many former benefits claimants will earn low wages in unstable employment and will require a range of supports to move from welfare to self-sufficiency and improved family well-being.

SHIFTING POLICY AND POLITICS OF FEDERAL CHILD BENEFITS IN CANADA

W. McKeen

Social Politics, vol. 8, 2001, p. 186-190

Feminists in Canada have been identified as a "special interest group" and their concerns have been marginalized. As a result, child benefits have been cut and women workers treated as "gender neutral", a false universalism that denies the extra burden of care giving responsibilities they carry.

THE UNITED STATES: WELFARE, WORK AND DEVELOPMENT

J. Midgley

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 10, 2001, p. 284-293

Article discusses the welfare reform programme and its impacts on both economic development and poverty in the United States. It discusses how welfare reform intends to reverse the allegedly negative economic effects of the system by requiring clients to work.

WELFARE REFORM AND "INELIGIBLES": ISSUE OF CONSTITUTIONALITY AND RECENT COURT RULINGS

R. Y. Kim

Social Work, vol. 46, 2001, p. 315-323

In 1996 welfare legislation made lawful immigrants to the US, with a few exemptions, ineligible for most forms of public assistance. Article reviews recent court rulings that have upheld the legislation and examines them in the light of two constitutional principles (the Equal Protection and Supremacy clauses) which have traditionally been applied to the issue of "aliens" eligibility for welfare benefits.

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