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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 1999): Social Housing - UK

BUILDING CONSTRUCTIVE RELATIONSHIPS

D. Gilliver
Housing, April 1999, p. 37-39.

Partnering relationships between social housing and the construction industry are still relatively rare, but with some organisations reporting cost savings of up to 50% and savings of up to 80% in time the benefits are clear. Article goes on to examine a number of case studies.

HOUSING, CARE AND SUPPORT: THE CHALLENGE OF BEST VALUE

R. Fraser and N. Ville
Housing, Care and Support, vol. 2, no. 1, 1999, p. 4-7.

Notes of two presentations at the Housing Care and Support Journal conference on the application of best value to supported housing.

ONE FOR ALL: A SINGLE TENANCY FOR SOCIAL HOUSING?

M. Hood
Coventry: Chartered Institute of Housing, 1999.

Examines the case for, and possible content of, a single tenancy for all forms of social housing. Aims to build a consensus around the principle of a single social tenancy, which would reconcile the differences between secure and assured tenancies and combine the best features of each. Important basic rights and obligations would be enshrined in statute and therefore be common to all as tenants. Additional rights and obligations for landlords and tenants could then be established by contract and incorporated in tenancy agreements.

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION: PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

P. Fletcher
Housing, Care and Support, vol. 2, no. 1, 1999, p. 12-16.

Changing expectations and a new integrated approach to the planning and funding of services will set major challenges for supported housing purchasers and providers. There will be a new emphasis on outcome measures, on genuine partnership with service users and on supporting vulnerable people in their communities.

THAMES RISING

S. Graham
Housing, April 1999, p. 22-23.

The Thames Gateway is the setting for one of the most sustained regeneration projects in the country. Over the next 25 years, 50,000 new homes and 1000,000 new jobs will flood into the area. This will increase demand for social housing. In order to meet this demand the planning process needs to be managed so that enough land is available for social housing, and that those homes are developed at a cost that results in affordable rents. Homes need to be provided in sustainable way, so that social housing contributes to social inclusion rather than social exclusion.

WHY HOME IN ON EQUITY

R. Terry
Public Finance, April 2-8 1999, p. 13

Article looks at the pitfalls of using equity investment in social housing. Equity investment means that:

  • the financial institution investing is landlord;
  • rents will have to increase in line with costs of management and maintenance;
  • there is an incentive for the Housing Association as manager to make a surplus by increasing rents faster than costs;
  • after 20 years (or longer) the landlord will have the right to sell the property when the tenancy ends to maximise its return.

WORKING TOGETHER: JOINT COMMISSIONING IN PRACTICE

T. Camp
Housing, Care and Support, vol. 2, no. 1, 1999, p. 28-30.

Describes a highly innovative project for joint commissioning of mental health accommodation set up by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and Kensington and Chelsea and Westminster Health Authority.

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