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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 1999): Child Welfare - UK

BETRAYAL OF INNOCENTS

C. Walby

Community Care, no. 1267, 1999, p. 16-17

Article examines progress in implementing the recommendations of the 1996 National Commission of Inquiry into the Prevention of Child Abuse. Enduring change for the better could be produced by:

  • the development of multi-agency financial planning for children's services;
  • improved data collection and reporting to Parliament about the condition of children in the UK;
  • changed attitudes to children in society at large.

CHILDREN INVOLVED IN PROSTITUTION : THE GOVERNMENT'S DRAFT GUIDANCE

S. Swann

Childright, no. 154, 19999 p. 15-16

Comments on draft guidance issued jointly by the Home Office and the Department of Health for statutory agencies dealing with children involved in prostitution. It is regrettable that there are no plans to decriminalise the specific offences of soliciting, loitering and importuning in relation to young people under 18. The emphasis on pursuing and prosecuting abusers who buy and sell children for sex is welcomed, as is the report's recognition of the importance of multi-agency working.

INCLUDING YOUNG PEOPLE IN URBAN REGENERATION : A LOT TO LEARN?

S. Fitzpatrick, A. Hastings and K. Kintrea

Bristol: Policy Press, 1998.

There is evidence that urban generation initiatives are starting to take youth involvement seriously. Nevertheless there is a lot to learn about how to turn aspiration for participation into reality. Study suggests that there is a danger of youth forums being regarded as the only means of youth involvement and then written off as a failure. Other mechanisms found to be successful in involving young people included surveys, focus groups and youth conferences.

SOCIAL SERVICES DIRECTORS DEFEND ADOPTION POLICY IF FACE OF MPs NEW ONSLAUGHT.

N. Valios

Community Care, no. 1268, 1999, p. 1

The all-party of group on adoption has attacked social services departments for placing too few of the children in care for adoption. Directors have pointed out in reply that the total numbers of children in care include those in respite care, secure accommodation, on short term care orders and in longer term foster placements with the aim of being reunited with their families. None of these are available for adoption. Many of the children available for adoption were difficult to place, being older or disabled. In some cases figures quoted by the MPs were plain wrong.

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