Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (February 2002): Education - UK - Higher

DEGREE COURSES TO INCLUDE WORK SKILLS

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Nov. 24th 2001, p.4

Reports government plans to align university output with the needs of industry. Degrees will have to include the teaching of work-related skills, and employers will be encouraged to send staff into higher education to develop the skills of their workforce.

FUNDING MECHANISM OR QUALITY ASSESSMENT: REPONSES TO THE RESEARCH ASSESSMENT EXERCISE IN ENGLISH INSTITUTIONS

H. G. Thomas

Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, vol. 23, 2001, p. 171-179

The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) was introduced in 1986 as a means of selectively allocating funds to universities on the basis of the quality of their research. Findings from interviews with staff in a range of institutions reveal different institutional and individual behaviour patterns in response to the RAE. Article explores those responses and considers the perceived tension between the RAE as an assessment of the quality of research (an accountability function) and as a means of selectively allocating research funding.

GOVERNMENT TO REFORM FUNDING OF UNIVERSITIES

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Nov. 16th 2001, p. 6

Government is planning to reform the way in which public funding is allocated to universities in order to reward excellence in areas other than research and to encourage diversity.

PLAN FOR GRADUATE TAX DROPPED IN SECOND U-TURN OVER GRANTS

A. Grice and B. Russell

Independent, Nov. 20th 2001, p. 1

Government appears to have dropped the idea of reintroducing student maintenance grants on the grounds that this would be too costly. Plans for a graduate tax on top of income tax have also been dropped on the grounds that this could be dubbed a "stealth tax on the middle classes". The idea of charging market interest rates on student loans is now being considered.

THE PRICE OF KNOWLEDGE

C. Ryan

Public Finance, Nov. 16th-22nd 2001, p. 28-29

The government's review of student finance was expected to restore means-tested maintenance grants for poorer students, abolish tuition fees and introduce a new tax on graduates' earnings.

'STOP CHILD BENEFITS AT 16 FOR WELL-OFF PUPILS'

J. O'Leary

Times, Dec. 3rd 2001, p. 6

The Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) has called for child benefit to be abolished from the age of sixteen with savings instead being put into a maintenance allowance for sixth formers and students from poor families. The IPPR is also urging the government to scrap its plans to reintroduce grants for university students and levy a graduate tax. Article goes on to discuss Tony Blair's target numbers of those he wants to see in higher education and the IPPR a report 'Opportunities for Whom?' which looks at how these plans may be realised and financed.

A STUDENT IS NOT JUST FOR CHRISTMAS

Anon

Labour Research, vol. 90, Dec. 2001, p. 12-13

An increasing number of students are working part time to pay their was through university following the abolition of maintenance grants and the introduction of tuition fees. Article discusses the trade union response.

STUDENTS GAIN A VOICE

D. MacLeod

Guardian Education Supplement, Nov. 27th 2001, p. 9

Article reports on a new structure whereby all new graduates will be asked to comment on the skills they gained at university and how satisfied they were with their degree courses. The results will be published by university not by course. It goes on to discuss David Caldwell, Director of Universities, Scotland and how he proposes to take the scheme one step further. It discusses how the scheme would be implemented and how it may impact on the sector.

UNIVERSITIES ASK FOR £10BN EXTRA TO WIDEN THEIR APPEAL

J. Kelly

Financial Times. Nov. 30th 2001, p. 4

Universities have called on the government for extra funding in order to meet its targets of widening access. The call has come as 20,000 bright students shun university because of financial worries or the need to start earning money. In order to meet government targets universities need to recruit and retain 30,000 new students by 2005-06. The extra places require more funding. Funding at marginal cost means quality will suffer. Margaret Hodge has made it clear that she would be prepared to scrap the "cap" on numbers imposed on universities to boost access to popular degree courses.

(See also Independent, Nov. 30th 2001, p. 1 + 16; Times, Nov. 30th 2001, p. 2; Guardian, Nov. 30th 2001, p. 12)

VISION IN PROGRESS

E. Major

Guardian Education Supplement, Nov. 20th 2001, p. 9

The Higher Education Funding Council for England and the Learning and Skills Council are developing a joint bid for funding to support universities and further education colleges in forming closer links with schools in order to encourage more pupils to enter higher education.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web