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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2002): Education - Overseas

CHANGE IN THE NATURE OF THE UNIVERSITY: THE QUALITY REGIME AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE UNIVERSITY TEACHING ENVIRONMENT

F. Buckley and J. Hurley

Social Science Information, vol. 40, 2001, p. 545-576

Recent decades have seen a radical change in the relationship between the university and the state and the business world. The jealously guarded concepts of academic freedom and autonomy have been threatened and even compromised. As state and business funding is conditional upon accountability and transparency of functioning, universities have been forced to adopt a quality model to justify their activities. Article argues that the validity of the application of crude quality metrics to the complex functioning of a university, particularly in relation to teaching, is suspect.

DOES CHOICE LEAD TO RACIALLY DISTINCTIVE SCHOOLS? CHARTER SCHOOLS AND HOUSEHOLD PREFERENCES

G. R. Weiher and K. L. Tedin

Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, vol. 21, 2002, p. 79-92

Report analyses the responses of 1006 charter school households in Texas at interview. It first examines the expressed preferences of the choosing household, and then compares expressed preferences with behaviour. A comparison of the characteristics of the traditional public schools that choosers leave with the characteristics of the charter schools they choose indicates that race is a good predictor of the choices that parents make. Whites, African Americans and Latinos transfer into charter schools where their groups comprise 11-14% more of the student body than the traditional public schools they are leaving.

EXAMINING THE GENERAL PROGRAMMATIC BENEFITS OF INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS

D. Fisher, V. Roach and N. Frey

International Journal of Inclusive Education, vol. 6, 2002, p. 63-78

The key elements of inclusive education in the USA are examined in the light of research from around the world. Pull-out and school-wide programming are discussed as well as membership and ability grouping. Student outcomes and student achievement studies are reviewed. The weight of the evidence suggests that inclusion has benefits for students with disabilities and does no harm to their non-disabled peers.

SOCIAL EXCLUSION, CHILDREN AND EDUCATION: IMPLICATIONS OF A RIGHTS-BASED APPROACH

S. Klasen

European Societies, vol. 3, 2001, p. 413-445

For some observers income poverty is too limiting a concept to describe the manifold disadvantages of some groups who are suffering social exclusion. This paper addresses social exclusion as the failure to have access to critical capabilities relating to integration into society. This is applied to the issue of social exclusion among children. On the basis of the analysis, some conclusions about education policy are offered.

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