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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2002): Social Housing - Overseas

THE LONG TERM EFFECTS OF PUBLIC HOUSING ON SELF-SUFFICIENCY

S. J. Newman and J. M. Harkness

Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, vol. 21, 2002, p. 21-43

Study uses data from the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine the effects of living in public housing as a child at some point between 1968 and 1982 on four young adult outcomes: welfare receipt; individual earnings; household earnings relative to the federal poverty line; and employment. Living in public housing during childhood increased employment, raised earnings and reduced welfare use, but had no effect on household earnings relative to the poverty line. The beneficial effects could have arisen because public housing improved physical living conditions, reduced residential mobility or enabled families to spend more of their income on items that help children's development.

HOUSING FOR OLDER ADULTS: NEW LESSONS FROM THE PAST

W. E. Folts and K. B. Muir

Research on Ageing, vol. 24, 2002, p. 10-28

Offers an overview of various innovative approaches to housing for older people which have emerged in the US over the past 20 years. These include Granny flats, various forms of shared housing, leisure - oriented retirement communities, continuing care retirement communities, and cohousing.

HOUSING ISSUES: SOME COMPARISONS BETWEEN THE IRISH REPUBLIC, NORTHERN IRELAND AND GREAT BRITAIN

A. Dearling

Social Work in Europe, vol. 8, no. 3, 2001, p. 43-50

At a time when "social inclusion" is high on most governments' social agendas, the provision of social housing has increasingly been viewed as a social welfare function, with responses to crime and anti-social behaviour being major part of landlords' roles.

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