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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2002): Care of the Elderly - UK

CARE HOME SUPPORT STAFF SEE HIGH PAY INCREASES

Anon

Caring Times, Feb. 2002, p. 1

Survey conducted by Pay and Workforce Research showed that hourly pay rates for care home support staff had risen by around 7.5% per year over the previous two years. The increases are above the rate of inflation and much higher es than pay rises elsewhere. Attributes the pay hikes to the introduction of the National Minimum Wage in April 1999 and the need to overcome recruitment and retention problems in the section.

CARING FOR A RELATIVE WITH DEMENTIA: THE PERCEPTIONS OF CARERS AND CPNS

S. Pickard and C. Glendinning

Quality in Aging, vol. 2, 2001, p. 3-11

Older people with dementia living in the community are most likely to be cared for by other older people who will be at increased risk of stress-related health problems themselves. This paper examines the experience of older carers and the kind of support available. The paper concludes by suggesting that lack of support for carers in these activities requires redress.

FREED BY GADGETING?

R Winchester

Community Care, Jan. 24th - 30th 2002, p. 34-35

Describes the New Technology in Elderly Care (NTEC) project which is developing assistive devices which should enable older people to remain independent for longer.

HALFWAY HOME

A. Zaatar

Health Service Journal, vol. 112, Jan. 31st 2002, p. 28-29

Reports the results of a pilot scheme which involved the purchase of 30 nursing home places to provide intermediate care for elderly people over four months in the winter of 2000/01. Two thirds of patients were discharged to their own homes after an average stay of 21 days. Patients rated the nursing care highly. However some concerns emerged about continuity of care and the availability of therapists.

HANDLE WITH CARE

Anon.

Health Which?, Feb. 2002, p.10-13

Focuses on the risk of resident abuse in care homes due to:

  • failure to vet staff thoroughly ;
  • wide variations between local authorities in inspection and monitoring procedures.

Suggest that inconsistencies will be ironed out when responsibility for inspection is handed over to the National Care Standards Commission in April 2002.

HAVE YOU GOT A SERVICE GUIDE?

P. Grose

Caring Times, Feb. 2002, p. 10 and 12

Discusses steps care home owners and managers need to take to ensure that their Service User Guide for residents and written contract conform with the requirements of the National Minimum Standards for Care Home for Older People, which have now become law.

ON THE HOME FRONT

R. Winchester

Community Care, Jan. 17th - 23rd 2002, p. 34-35

Faced with dwindling profits from their businesses, independent care home owners are forming consortia to demand increases of up to 40% in the fees local authorities pay for state funded residents. They are refusing to accept state funded residents unless the higher rates are paid. In extreme cases, care providers are threatening to evict frail elderly residents unless their demands are met.

QUALITY DEMENTIA CARE STANDARDS FOR CARE HOMES

J. Vaughan

Registered Homes and Services, vol. 6, 2002, p. 134-136

Reviews the methodology used by an Alzheimer's Society project team to develop person-centred standards of care for both residential homes and the domiciliary sector.

RISING NURSING HOME COSTS "SWALLOW UP" RESIDENTS' FREE NURSING CARE

K. Leason

Community Care, Feb. 7th-13th 2002, p. 18-19

The Department of Health directs payments towards the cost of nursing care to the homes, not the residents. These are supposed to pass the money on to residents either directly or through reductions in fees. Some now stand accused of not only failing to pass on the free nursing care contribution but also of increasing their fees.

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