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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2002): Education - Overseas

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IN COLLEGE ADMISSIONS: EXAMINING LABOR MARKET EFFECTS OF FOUR ALTERNATIVE POLICIES

B. Wydick

Contemporary Economic Policy, vol. 20, 2002, p.12-24

Presents a game-theoretic analysis of four different types of affirmative action in college admission in the US:

  • race-based preferential policy;
  • disadvantage-based preferential policy;
  • a policy heavily weighting high school academic rank;
  • a policy focused on college preparation of targeted (disadvantaged) groups.

Concludes that only the fourth policy would enable colleges to achieve campus diversity without triggering labour market discrimination.

ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIERS IN MAINSTREAM SCHOOLS

H. Hemmingson and L. Borell

Child: Care, Health and Development, vol. 28, 2002, p. 57-63

Study highlights the fact that the majority of students with physical disabilities in Swedish mainstream schools experienced barriers to participation in both the physical and social environment. Many of the barriers to participation seemed to originate from how learning was organised and carried out in schools and were not primarily related to diagnosis or level of locomotion. These findings are consistent with theories regarding the dynamic interaction of health conditions and environmental factors for functioning.

THE EVOLUTION OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING STRATEGIES IN SINGAPORE, TAIWAN AND S. KOREA: A DEVELOPMENT MODEL OF SKILL FORMATION

D. Ashton et al

Journal of Education and Work, vol. 15, 2002, p.5-30

Article demonstrates how the industrial policies pursued by the three Asian Tigers enabled them to influence the direction of economic growth and the type of industries developed. Article also highlights the linking mechanisms in the shape of super-ministries, which ensured that decisions about education and training provision reflected the existing and future skill demands of the economy, and how the implementation of those decisions was assured through strict control over the delivery of education and training. Finally it shows how these governments created conditions in which they could manage the relationship between capital and labour. This enabled them to manage their human resources and sustain growth by moving into higher value-added product markets in selected industries.

FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT AND FINANCIAL AID FOR STUDENTS : SOME REFLECTIONS ON GRZELCZYK AND FAHMI AND ESMORIS-CERDEIRO PINEDO AMORIS

A. Pieter van der Mei

European Journal of Social Security, vol. 3, 2001, p. 181-207

Article argues that Community Law should not be developed in such a way as to confer upon students extensive rights to financial aid covering the costs of maintenance in the state of education but rather by recognition of a right to export student grants. The article puts Grzelczyk and Fahmi in their legal historical context.

IMPACT OF IMMIGRATION POLICY ON EDUCATION REFORM

A. R. Contreras

Education and Urban Society, vol. 34, 2002, p. 134-155

Presents an analysis of how rising levels of immigration is affecting US schools. In order to benefit from education and to gain the qualifications they need to compete in the labour market, immigrant children need support through differentiated curricula, help with learning English, newcomer programmes, and strong links between schools and the community.

LEARN: A COMMUNITY STUDY ABOUT LATINO IMMIGRANTS AND EDUCATION

H. J. McLaughlin et al

Education and Urban Society, vol. 34, 2002, p. 212-232

Based on the analysis of a series of focus group interviews and a survey, article discusses how immigrant children coming to the US from other countries are accustomed to a different classroom environment and may be confused about now to related to their teachers and the other pupils. At the same time, teachers may not possess adequate knowledge of students' prior educational experiences and the cultural models of schooling in Latino communities.

NEWCOMER PROGRAMS: AN EDUCATIONAL ALTERNATIVE FOR SECONDARY IMMIGRANT STUDENTS

D. J. Short

Education and Urban Society, vol. 34, 2002, p. 173-198

Article examines the growing number of newcomer programmes for recent immigrant English language learners being implemented in US urban secondary schools. Describes the programme designs, their educational goals, their instructional practices, their acculturation strategies and other issues. Vignettes about selected programmes illustrate the data.

PERIPHERAL VOICES : PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT, SOCIAL CLASS AND EDUCATIONAL DISADVANTAGE

J. Hanafin and A. Lynch

British Journal of Sociology of Education, vol. 23, 2002, p. 35-49

Group interviews with parents of pupils in a primary school in the disadvantaged areas scheme in the Republic of Ireland suggest that parental involvement in school is limited to the giving and receiving of information, restricted consultation and engagement in some supplemental responsibilities. Although parents were interested, informed and concerned about their children's education, they felt excluded from participation in decision-making about school management and organisation, about matters that affected them personally and financially, and about their children's progress.

SCHOOL VOUCHERS IN SUPREME COURT SPOTLIGHT

P. Waldmeir

Financial Times, Feb 21st 2002, p. 8

The US Supreme Court is considering whether the city of Cleveland's school voucher scheme violates the constitutionally mandated separation between church and state. Most of the money ends up going to religious schools as they are the only ones with tuition fees low enough to be covered by the vouchers.

TEACHER PREPARATION AND THE EDUCATION OF IMMIGRANT CHILDREN

A. L. Goodwin

Education and Urban Society, vol. 34, 2002, p. 156-172

Article looks at teacher training in the USA in the light of changing demographics due to increased immigration. On the basis of a literature review, paper outlines key issues that must be taken into account when training teachers to work effectively with immigrant children, including differentiation of instruction, support for second language learning and work with families and communities.

UNDERACHIEVING. MUST TRY HARDER

E. Tucker

Financial Times, Feb 13th 2002, p. 12

Reports by the OECD have shown that Germany's universities are failing to provide industry with the skills it needs. Only one in six German school-leavers completes a degree, compared with one in three in the UK. Degree courses remain highly theoretical and academic, and take 4 to 5 years to complete, which puts off many young people. Universities have recently introduced three year courses, but these are viewed with suspicion. Finally, innovation is stifled because universities and academic staff are autonomous and there is a lack of accountability. Government is addressing this problem through introduction of an element of performance related pay and by making it easier for younger people to become professors.

WHY SCHOOL SYSTEMS RESIST REFORM : A PSYCHOANALYTIC PERSPECTIVE

H. S. Baum

Human Relations, vol. 55, 2002, p. 173-198

Members of the public place unrealistic expectations on schools, insisting they take full responsibility for educating children. Educators, acting out of professional pride, accept nearly everything related to children's education thrown their way. The inevitable result is that school systems fail, and they end up feeling so attacked and humiliated that they give priority to defending themselves from threat and anxiety over educating children. They then become intensely suspicious of outsiders, avoid relationships with other potentially supportive entities, and resist all change.

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