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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2002): Education - UK - Higher

ACCESSING EDUCATION: EFFECTIVELY WIDENING PARTICIPATION

P. Burke

Stoke-on-Trent; Trentham Books, 2002

This book is based on the experiences of academics, access practitioners and access students. The study reveals how access as currently provided can intimidate the students it is meant to serve, reinforcing exclusion and poverty, and reproducing unequal power relations. It illustrates how a collaboratively developed pedagogy for access courses, committed to anti-classist, anti-sexist and antiracist approaches to teaching and learning would empower students to succeed.

MIDDLE CLASSES TO PAY MORE FOR THEIR CAMPUS DAYS

T. Baldwin

Times, Mar. 6th 2002, p.1

Predicts that following a review of student finance government will charge middle class youngsters something close to market rates of interest on their loans. The extra income generated would be used to give poorer students maintenance allowances. An alternative proposal would see these financed by a sharp rise in tuition fees.

TIME TO END THE FREE RIDE

P. Lampl

Daily Telegraph, Mar. 13th 2002, p.24

Calls for parents of middle class students to pay the full cost of their university education to free up resources to subsidise youngsters from low income families. Setting tuition fees at market rates would also make the universities independent of state funding and help pay for better facilities.

WHAT THE SCOTS CAN TEACH THE ENGLISH ABOUT STUDENT LOANS

M. Linklater

Times, Mar. 7th 2002, p. 22

In 2000 the Scottish Executive reformed student finance by abolishing tuition fees for Scottish students, introducing a non-repayable maintenance grant for poorer students, and launching a graduate endowment scheme to replace student loans. Every Scottish university is now reporting a rise in student numbers in the aftermath of the changes.

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