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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2002): Social Housing - UK

BEST VALUE: USING THE FRAMEWORK TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE CONSUMER

S. Bennett

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5, Feb. 2002, p. 4-6

The Best Value framework provides a key process for achieving the objectives of the Supporting People programme and can underpin user involvement in the design and delivery of support services.

EXTRA CARE HOUSING: A REVIEW OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF EXTRA CARE HOUSING FOR OLDER PEOPLE

S. Vallely

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5, Feb. 2002, p. 7-11

Paper gives a brief critical overview of Anchor Trust's research into extra care housing provision for older people and reviews evidence of its effectiveness.

EXTRA CARE VILLAGES: MEETING THE NEEDS OF A NEW CENTURY

J. Payne

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5, Feb. 2002, p.15-18

Article describes a village model of extra care housing provision which offers substantial communal facilities and mixed-tenure possibilities.

FOSTERING A SENSE OF BELONGING: HOUSING'S NEW CHALLENGE

S. Khan

Housing, Feb. 2002, p. 34-34

Discusses the role of the social housing sector in creating racially divided and segregated communities through allocation policies, the activities of black housing associations and area-based regeneration programmes.

GROUP DYNAMICS

Audit Commission

Audit Commission Publications, 2002

A Registered Social Landlord (RSL) group is an association of separate organisations that enter into formal agreements to work together. The parent organisation must be an RSL; the subsidiaries may include companies or charities delivering services which bear no direct relationship to social housing provision, such as skills training. Three-quarters of RSL homes are now part of such a formal "group". Report looks at why group structures are popular among RSLs, and whether they deliver planned benefits. It considers whether RSLs not in a group can deliver the same benefits, and whether current systems of accountability and regulation work for complex group-based relationships.

HA PLC?

B. Randall

Housing, Feb. 2002, p. 20-21

Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of allowing some of the larger housing associations to become public companies. This would enable government to end subsidies and allow the associations to look for private funding.

HOUSING RIGHTS OF 16 AND 17-YEAR-OLDS

T. Benjamin

ChildRight, no. 183, 2002, p.18-20

A number of recent and impending legislative changes will positively affect the service that 16 - and 17 years olds receive from local authorities, and should promote better communication between housing and social services. The Children (Leaving Care) Act 2002 imposes new and stronger duties on social services to support young people leaving care. The Homelessness (Priority Need for Accommodation) Order 2001 will increase that categories of young people that should be accommodated by Housing Departments under the homelessness legislation. The Homelessness Bill will introduce a new duty on local authorities to draw up an action plan to prevent homelessness.

LICENSING LESSONS

B. Buck

Roof, Mar/Apr 2002, p.36-37

Scottish councils have experienced difficulties in discharging the duty laid on them in October 2000 to license houses in multiple occupation (HMOs). They have found problems in identifying HMOs in their area, and landlords have already become adept at evasion and avoidance. There are also wide and unacceptable variations in the level of registration fees across the country.

HALLS OF PRIVATISATION

P. Gosling

Housing, Feb. 2002, p. 22-24

Reports that housing associations are moving into the lucrative business of providing halls of residence accommodation for students.

WHY ARE WE WAITING?

M. Delargy

Roof, Mar/Apr 2002, p. 20-21

The government still has not finalised plans to collect detailed information on the use of evictions by social landlords. Possession orders in favour of social landlords have increased for nine years in succession. Survey evidence suggests that most evictions are for rent arrears. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the arrears are due in many cases to delays in processing housing benefit claims.

(See also Roof, Mar/Apr 2002, p. 22-23)

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