Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2002): Social Care - UK

ADULT DAY SERVICES AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: BETTER DAYS

C. Clark (ed)

London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2002. (Research Highlights in Social Work; 39)

This book places adult day services in the context of social provision and explores their role alongside field social work, health care, domiciliary services and accommodation. It highlights the importance of this sector in contributing to social inclusion. It focuses on how to meet the diverse needs of service users rather than on the running of 'day centres'. It examines services for people experiencing old age, learning disabilities, mental health problems or physical disability and those socially excluded by unemployment, poverty and homelessness or crime.

CARE REGULATION IS CHANGING

Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care

2002

From 1 April 2002 a new national body for Scotland, the Care Commission, will regulate care services against national standards according to the Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001 and associated regulations. Publication gives details for providers.

URL: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/library3/health/scrc.pdf

THE CARE STANDARDS ACT 2002: THE NEW REGULATORY FRAMEWORK

L. Convery

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5, Feb. 2002, p. 23-27

The government has produced a raft of secondary legislation relating to the implementation of the Care Standards Act. Article summarises these regulations, covering the new requirements for registration by care homes and agencies, the national minimum of standards for social care provision, the role of the National Care Standards Commission and the content of the Care Home Regulations 2001.

COUNCILS WARN COLLAPSE IN SOCIAL CARE WILL HIT NHS

K. Brown

Financial Times, March 11th 2002, p. 4

Local authority leaders have agreed to tell ministers that a shortfall of at least £150m a year in government funding for residential and nursing care in south-eastern England is causing a "meltdown" in social care. Property prices in the south east mean that many care homes are worth more as vacant properties than as businesses.

FAIRER CHARGING POLICIES FOR HOME CARE AND OTHER NON-RESIDENTIAL SOCIAL SERVICES: PRACTICE GUIDANCE

Department of Health

London: 2002

Consultation draft covers disability expenditure assessment and provision of benefits advice along with charge assessments by local councils.

IN WHOM WE TRUST

T. Philpot

Community Care, Feb. 28th - Mar. 6th 2002, p. 26-28

Some former social services directors now in charge of primary care trusts give their views on the future of social work. They predict the demise of local authority social services departments, and the re-emergence of social work within PCTs.

NHS GOOD, SOCIAL SERVICES BAD?

J. Snell

Community Care, Feb. 28th - Mar. 6th 2002, p. 18

Social services chiefs argue that without substantial new government investment in social care, the planned NHS reforms will fail. The NHS has received the lion's share of new public money, while social services have been relatively starved of investment.

RESIDENTIAL FAMILY CENTRES: REGULATIONS AND NATIONAL MINIMUM STANDARDS: CONSULTATION DOCUMENT

Department of Health

London: 2002

Contains the proposed regulations and national minimum standards for residential family centres. These will be used by the National Care Standards Commission when it takes responsibility for registration and inspection of these centres in July 2002.

SOCIAL CARE AND HEALTH: A NEW DEAL?

I. Allen (ed)

London: Policy Studies Institute, 2001

(PSI report; 879)

Includes papers on:

  • the changing relationship between collective responsibility and individual rights;
  • the effects that changing boundaries have on the role, responsibilities and relationship between health and social services;
  • a consideration of social services departments since Seebohm;
  • the likely future impact of the NHS Plan.

The final paper explores the effects, both real and potential, on social services of further changes in the links between health and social care.

TACKLING SOCIAL EXCLUSION

J. Pierson

London: Routledge, 2002, (social work skills series; 3)

This book lays out approaches to practice for social workers and others involved in efforts to tackle social exclusion. It explains what social exclusion is and what steps need to be taken to avert it. It recognises that social work is a wide and diverse profession. The book includes chapters that demonstrate the practice and skills needed to support a variety of situations, including dealing with families and children excluded through poverty, distressed urban neighbourhoods, racism, refugees and asylum seekers.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web